How to determine your axle type?

Kata

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I purchased a JL Wrangler Sahara with an Anti-Spin Differential Rear Axle, and the 2.72:1 Selec Trac Full Time 4WD System. Does this mean I have the M186 Front Axle / Dana Wide M220 Rear Axle? Or do I have the M186 Front Axle / M200 Rear Axle? Here’s my POC. Thanks in advance.

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$uicide$hift

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I purchased a JL Wrangler Sahara with an Anti-Spin Differential Rear Axle, and the 2.72:1 Selec Trac Full Time 4WD System. Does this mean I have the M186 Front Axle / Dana Wide M220 Rear Axle? Or do I have the M186 Front Axle / M200 Rear Axle? Here’s my POC. Thanks in advance.

EE363D34-5A0A-43D1-91C1-22894488F521.jpeg
It will be listed on your build sheet once the vehicle is built. I have a Sahara with Anti-Spin Diff as well. My build sheet shows:

Dana M186 Front Axle
Dana M220 Rear Axle

I believe the Rubicon axle is a different wide axle.
 
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Kata

Kata

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My window sticker “this Vehicle was built especially for “my name” says that I have the 3rd Generation Dana 44 HD Rear Axle. So with that confirmation is it safe to say that I can run 37’s on my JlUS?
 

$uicide$hift

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My window sticker “this Vehicle was built especially for “my name” says that I have the 3rd Generation Dana 44 HD Rear Axle. So with that confirmation is it safe to say that I can run 37’s on my JlUS?
You can run 37's. If you wheel hard though you have more potential to break something with the additional weight. You will also cause more wear and tear on your drive train. Your braking will suffer, it will not ride the same, it will have more road noise, and you will loose some MPG and it will not take off the line the same.

I am not saying do not do it. I am just saying you cannot make such a huge change and not have it affect anything else. Wheels are part of your drive train and this will affect a lot of other components. If it is for true off road rock crawling where it is needed just know of the additional maintenance. If it is for the cool look just be prepared to spend a lot more money.
 
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Kata

Kata

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You can run 37's. If you wheel hard though you have more potential to break something with the additional weight. You will also cause more wear and tear on your drive train. Your braking will suffer, it will not ride the same, it will have more road noise, and you will loose some MPG and it will not take off the line the same.

I am not saying do not do it. I am just saying you cannot make such a huge change and not have it affect anything else. Wheels are part of your drive train and this will affect a lot of other components. If it is for true off road rock crawling where it is needed just know of the additional maintenance. If it is for the cool look just be prepared to spend a lot more money.
Thanks for pointing that out to me. What if I go with 35’s, would that be a safer choice? Just trying to figure it how big of a tire I can go with without damaging my Wrangler. Thanks in advance
 

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Thanks for pointing that out to me. What if I go with 35’s, would that be a safer choice? Just trying to figure it how big of a tire I can go with without damaging my Wrangler. Thanks in advance
It is not so much damaging the Jeep. It is a change and it affects a lot of other components.

First thing is weight. The rotational mass will be increased causing more wear and tear. I would stick with 35's and look for light wheels and tires to minimize the weight. There are others on here that have found decent setups. You will need to put a lift on the Jeep to run 35's in order to get no rubbing issues. The other consideration for a nice look and a lot less money is to buy another persons Rubicon take off 33" tires. That is a nice looking setup where you won't need a lift and the difference is minimal.

The new 8 speed transmission and 3.45 gear ratio will handle 35's but you wont have the get up and go you had before. From others it has been minimal. This is subjective and you may want to re-gear. Later on you could re-gear to 4.10 gears if you want to get the performance back. You may find the performance hit negligible and not bother which is fine.
 

ryandamartini

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Thanks for pointing that out to me. What if I go with 35’s, would that be a safer choice? Just trying to figure it how big of a tire I can go with without damaging my Wrangler. Thanks in advance
I have a Sport S. A lot isn't fully clear on what the new axles will safely handle. I've seen zero full breakdowns of each axle SKU with what's been strengthened versus the previous generation, materials, etc. For a while, Jeep had said the new 44 was stronger so people immediately slap 37 & 40" tires on it and call it a day. I'm just not convinced that they've been strengthened to that point with the JK 44 being twisted up by 37s with chromoly shafts & gussets welded in.. To each their own though.

With anything other than a Rubicon, I wouldn't entertain anything over a 35" tire really. At that point you're going to be looking at beefing up all the supporting components. I just feel like a time bomb of component replacement is coming from all the caution to the wind happening with these Jeeps.

Also if it's going to be used off road, take into consideration the fenders. Sports & Sarahas have lower clearing fenders. At full flex with 35" tires, you're going to need more lift. From what I've gathered, 2.5-3" OR change to Rubicon/aftermarket fenders.

Me personally, I'm looking at going with the Mopar lift with 255/80/17 or the 2.5" Icon lift with 35" tires with new rims. Im just not sure I want to gamble with the 35" tires. Its such a nice driving Jeep that I don't want daily drama out of it.
 

$uicide$hift

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@Kata another piece of advice....

Just drive it and enjoy it. Take it off road and see how extremely capable Jeeps are in complete stock form. I know the big tires and lift look cool but if this is a daily driver and rarely sees off road or any extreme terrain, leave it stock and enjoy it.

If you do go off road your money would be better spent on recovery gear first before lift and tires.
 

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Good points by all. The other thing to understand is only your rear axle is the “D44”. Your front doesn’t change so you have what we believe is the equivalent of a “D30”. Sure there are improvements but to what extent is unknown. It’s possible the front axle will be most affected by 37s, more so in off-roading situations.
 
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