Has anybody noticed oil consumption between oil changes?

JimLee

Well-Known Member
First Name
Jim
Joined
Mar 29, 2019
Messages
3,170
Reaction score
14,259
Location
Too damn close to Death Valley
Vehicle(s)
'19 JLU
What they are catching may not all be evaporation, either. There could be fuel or other things in there, too. I'd love to analyze some of it and see what exactly is in it.

One particularly interesting thing you brought up with the 3.6 and its tendency to burn oil at extreme angles, such as climbing a steep hill. (Hasn't happened to me but I've witnessed it). Those with catch cans don't experience this.

I would guess, as well, that it is evaporated oil. It would be fun to do an experiment with a catch can and see if a low Noack oil like M1 EP or Ravenol produces less fluid in the catch can than a higher Noack oil, such as most Group III 0w20's, which are typically just under the threshold allowed by Dexos 1 Gen 2, which is 13 or so percent. Run them both for say, 2000 miles, or however long the higher Noack oil has to run to put a measurable amount into the catch can.

Maybe Project Farm would do that, but I don't know if he has a Jeep! Lol!

I'd still bet that fuel makes up a pretty decent percentage of what is caught in there. But that's just a guess.
If you have the means i can send you a sample no problems, id even make it fresh. Or maybe I could send some in for an oil analysis.
Advertisement

 

Rodeoflyer

Well-Known Member
First Name
Bert
Joined
Dec 16, 2019
Messages
891
Reaction score
619
Location
Conifer, Colorado
Vehicle(s)
2020 Jeep JLUR; 2016 Ram Powerwagon
Vehicle Showcase
1
What they are catching may not all be evaporation, either. There could be fuel or other things in there, too. I'd love to analyze some of it and see what exactly is in it.

One particularly interesting thing you brought up with the 3.6 and its tendency to burn oil at extreme angles, such as climbing a steep hill. (Hasn't happened to me but I've witnessed it). Those with catch cans don't experience this.

I would guess, as well, that it is evaporated oil. It would be fun to do an experiment with a catch can and see if a low Noack oil like M1 EP or Ravenol produces less fluid in the catch can than a higher Noack oil, such as most Group III 0w20's, which are typically just under the threshold allowed by Dexos 1 Gen 2, which is 13 or so percent. Run them both for say, 2000 miles, or however long the higher Noack oil has to run to put a measurable amount into the catch can.

Maybe Project Farm would do that, but I don't know if he has a Jeep! Lol!

I'd still bet that fuel makes up a pretty decent percentage of what is caught in there. But that's just a guess.
I'm running redline 0w20, a group IV/V base. I did order some amsoil 0w20 to test on my next change.
 

CarbonSteel

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 21, 2019
Messages
1,852
Reaction score
2,084
Location
Colorado
Vehicle(s)
2019 Jeep Rubicon Unlimited
Vehicle Showcase
1
I have not noticed any oil loss between changes thus far, everything seems normal at this point. I did a few short changes at the beginning:

OC #1 was at 800 miles
OC #2 was at 2,000 miles
OC #3 was at 5,000 miles
OC #4 was at 10,000 miles

I added a UPR catch can a while back and will start monitoring it regularly to see what is collected. I may send it off for a UOA for grins and giggles @DanW.
 

DanW

Well-Known Member
First Name
Dan
Joined
Mar 2, 2017
Messages
7,586
Reaction score
9,672
Location
Indiana
Vehicle(s)
18 JLUR, 08 JKUR, 15 Ford Transit 350, 04 WJ 4.7, 17 Renegade, 99 Merc E430 S
Vehicle Showcase
2
I have not noticed any oil loss between changes thus far, everything seems normal at this point. I did a few short changes at the beginning:

OC #1 was at 800 miles
OC #2 was at 2,000 miles
OC #3 was at 5,000 miles
OC #4 was at 10,000 miles

I added a UPR catch can a while back and will start monitoring it regularly to see what is collected. I may send it off for a UOA for grins and giggles @DanW.
Lol, do it! I'd be fascinated to know what's in that stuff!
 

flyer92

Well-Known Member
First Name
Jeff
Joined
Feb 6, 2021
Messages
333
Reaction score
345
Location
California
Vehicle(s)
'21 2-Door JL Sport, '80 CJ-5, former '99 TJ
Vehicle Showcase
2
Just check your oil level in the morning after it's sat overnight after first doing your oil change, then check your oil the same way every time (letting it sit overnight).

Not any noticeable oil usage on my JL, the oil has always been to the top of the cross-hatch section on the dipstick after letting it sit overnight. I always change my own oil w/ 5qt jugs, so not a drop over 5 qts :)

Now if you aren't changing your own oil and especially if it's a Jeep dealer doing it, you will want to check your oil ASAP after getting it serviced to make sure it wasn't overfilled. So letting it sit 30 minutes (if possible) should get a pretty solid reading.
Agree with waiting overnight to ensure that all the oil has thoroughly drained into the pan, so just curious why the manual advises to only wait for 5 minutes on a warm engine. If the level appears low after five minutes and you add more oil to top it off, then won't you overfill the crank case?
 

blnewt

Well-Known Member
First Name
Brad
Joined
Oct 8, 2018
Messages
4,655
Reaction score
4,759
Location
New Mexico
Vehicle(s)
2019 Jeep JL V6 SportS, (Retired 74 CJ-5, 80 CJ-7)
Agree with waiting overnight to ensure that all the oil has thoroughly drained into the pan, so just curious why the manual advises to only wait for 5 minutes on a warm engine. If the level appears low after five minutes and you add more oil to top it off, then won't you overfill the crank case?
0w-20 is very thin oil so you should get a fairly accurate reading after 5 minutes when warm. The amount of oil still getting back into the pan from the motor components won't account for much after 5 minutes, not really enough to be concerned about overfilling. Just take the side of caution and add a bit less then you would normally would be my advice.
 

flyer92

Well-Known Member
First Name
Jeff
Joined
Feb 6, 2021
Messages
333
Reaction score
345
Location
California
Vehicle(s)
'21 2-Door JL Sport, '80 CJ-5, former '99 TJ
Vehicle Showcase
2
0w-20 is very thin oil so you should get a fairly accurate reading after 5 minutes when warm. The amount of oil still getting back into the pan from the motor components won't account for much after 5 minutes, not really enough to be concerned about overfilling. Just take the side of caution and add a bit less then you would normally would be my advice.
OK, thanks...as an old Jeep guy, this is the thinnest oil I've ever used (by far), so just gotta get used to it! Much appreciated.
 

blnewt

Well-Known Member
First Name
Brad
Joined
Oct 8, 2018
Messages
4,655
Reaction score
4,759
Location
New Mexico
Vehicle(s)
2019 Jeep JL V6 SportS, (Retired 74 CJ-5, 80 CJ-7)
OK, thanks...as an old Jeep guy, this is the thinnest oil I've ever used (by far), so just gotta get used to it! Much appreciated.
I'm 58, and my last Jeep, prior to our JL was 30 years ago, so I guess we have a common thread :)
 

flyer92

Well-Known Member
First Name
Jeff
Joined
Feb 6, 2021
Messages
333
Reaction score
345
Location
California
Vehicle(s)
'21 2-Door JL Sport, '80 CJ-5, former '99 TJ
Vehicle Showcase
2
I'm 58, and my last Jeep, prior to our JL was 30 years ago, so I guess we have a common thread :)
LOL...not far behind you in age, so no doubt!

As for the oil issue, I noticed that the level was well above the hash marks and up onto the steel "dip cable" when cold, which was alarming. I had to drain a full quart of just to get the level back down to the maximum fill line at the top of the hash marks. Then I drove 15 miles on the freeway, shut down, and let the vehicle sit for 5-6 minutes. When I checked the oil again, it was well below the hash marks, which was equally alarming. Added a half quart of oil to get the level back into the hash marks, and then drove home. So...now I'm not sure what's even accurate anymore...trusting the owner's manual and checking while hot, or trusting years of experience and checking when cold. The difference is pretty stark when the cold check shows the level at maximum and the hot check shows it below minimum.

Furthermore, I have only 250 miles on the engine, and the oil was black as night. Wondering if that's normal too, but perhaps it is for these new-fangled thin lubricants.
 

blnewt

Well-Known Member
First Name
Brad
Joined
Oct 8, 2018
Messages
4,655
Reaction score
4,759
Location
New Mexico
Vehicle(s)
2019 Jeep JL V6 SportS, (Retired 74 CJ-5, 80 CJ-7)
LOL...not far behind you in age, so no doubt!

As for the oil issue, I noticed that the level was well above the hash marks and up onto the steel "dip cable" when cold, which was alarming. I had to drain a full quart of just to get the level back down to the maximum fill line at the top of the hash marks. Then I drove 15 miles on the freeway, shut down, and let the vehicle sit for 5-6 minutes. When I checked the oil again, it was well below the hash marks, which was equally alarming. Added a half quart of oil to get the level back into the hash marks, and then drove home. So...now I'm not sure what's even accurate anymore...trusting the owner's manual and checking while hot, or trusting years of experience and checking when cold. The difference is pretty stark when the cold check shows the level at maximum and the hot check shows it below minimum.

Furthermore, I have only 250 miles on the engine, and the oil was black as night. Wondering if that's normal too, but perhaps it is for these new-fangled thin lubricants.
I did my first change at 1,000 miles, have always done that will all my new vehicles.. I'd just measure it when cold, if it's anywhere in that cross hatched area on the stick you'll be ok. Then at 1k miles be sure to do the oil change yourself. Let it drain (when warm) for about 30 minutes just for your own piece of mind. Then just use a 5qt jug, run it a bit to warm it up, then let it sit at least 30 minutes. Check your level on the stick, whatever it reads you will then know FOR SURE that that's where 5qts truly is :)
FWIW mine is exactly to the top of the hatched section at an exact 5qts.
 

flyer92

Well-Known Member
First Name
Jeff
Joined
Feb 6, 2021
Messages
333
Reaction score
345
Location
California
Vehicle(s)
'21 2-Door JL Sport, '80 CJ-5, former '99 TJ
Vehicle Showcase
2
Good call on the 1,000-mile oil change...definitely going to do that. After yesterday's measuring experiment, the oil level is now at the maximum when fully cold, and almost in the middle of the hash marks when hot. Will probably just add a half quart and call it good until I do the first oil change. Appreciate the insight. Even though none of this is rocket surgery, it's nice having others to bounce ideas/questions off of. We are lucky to have such a knowledgeable and responsive group.
 

Laststand

Well-Known Member
First Name
Ken
Joined
Jan 19, 2018
Messages
1,472
Reaction score
10,577
Location
Pensacola, FL
Vehicle(s)
JL Sport S 3.6/auto, 2014 Acura RDX
Occupation
Retired USMC
Interesting observation on my most recent change (3rd since I've owned it). I do all my own oil changes/checks. Jeep in service a year ago (1 April) and I changed the oil and filter at 2500 and 5000 with no consumption/change noticed. Additionally used oil took up close to 5 quarts when poured back into the empty 5qt container.

I checked the oil lever periodically since 5000 and it's held steady - will admit I was lax toward the end and probably didn't check it in the last say 1000 since it held steady.

I performed an oil and filter change this past Wednesday at 10000 miles. I pour the used oil back into the empty container and it barely comes to the 4 quart level. Now scratching my head on the "missing" quart. I, of course, did not get a dipstick reading prior so no reference point on this change.

Plan to keep and eye on this and check oil level at least during each fill up (weekly). I also plan to check the dipstick right before changing to see if it is reading full. Little disconcerting since it's been awhile since I've had an engine use any appreciable oil between changes (although a quart in 5000 is not out of spec/ordinary).

Oh, no oil leaks noted on engine or ground:).
 

DanW

Well-Known Member
First Name
Dan
Joined
Mar 2, 2017
Messages
7,586
Reaction score
9,672
Location
Indiana
Vehicle(s)
18 JLUR, 08 JKUR, 15 Ford Transit 350, 04 WJ 4.7, 17 Renegade, 99 Merc E430 S
Vehicle Showcase
2
Interesting observation on my most recent change (3rd since I've owned it). I do all my own oil changes/checks. Jeep in service a year ago (1 April) and I changed the oil and filter at 2500 and 5000 with no consumption/change noticed. Additionally used oil took up close to 5 quarts when poured back into the empty 5qt container.

I checked the oil lever periodically since 5000 and it's held steady - will admit I was lax toward the end and probably didn't check it in the last say 1000 since it held steady.

I performed an oil and filter change this past Wednesday at 10000 miles. I pour the used oil back into the empty container and it barely comes to the 4 quart level. Now scratching my head on the "missing" quart. I, of course, did not get a dipstick reading prior so no reference point on this change.

Plan to keep and eye on this and check oil level at least during each fill up (weekly). I also plan to check the dipstick right before changing to see if it is reading full. Little disconcerting since it's been awhile since I've had an engine use any appreciable oil between changes (although a quart in 5000 is not out of spec/ordinary).

Oh, no oil leaks noted on engine or ground:).
Make sure you drain a long time. You could drain it for an hour and then let it drain all night and you'd be surprised that you still get a cup or more by morning.

But still, some oil usage is normal. I've got several engines that run great and use some oil, including a JK with a 3.8 with 152k miles on it. It drinks quite a bit, but purrs like a kitten.
 
Advertisement

Hothead Headliners
 
Advertisement
Top