Glock Guy advice needed.

JeepU4IA

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Are the rounds consistently hitting, say low left, if you are right handed for example. It is easier to diagnose some shooting errors by where the rounds hit compared to where you are aiming.
The trigger is going to be wildly different that a nice tuned 1911 trigger and takes some adjustment as stated above.
I do love my Glocks!!
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I love my Glock 17 (9mm). At first, I was shooting tight groups but low left as you mentioned. Then I learned this is due to a tight grip. I loosened my grip a little and saw much improvement.



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Gadsden11

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Glad you could fix your grip with a little adjustment!! Low left is very common for right handed shooters. So.etimes its grip and sometimes it's a jerky trigger pull or a sympathetic Squeezing of the other three fingers on your right hand tightening as you pull the trigger.
 

Wabujitsu

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I find Jeep guys often own guns and have some valuable hunting/ Shooting advice. Plus this is the only forum I participate in currently and don't really know many shooting forums. I need some advice about my new Glock 20. I normally shoot 1911 (.45, 10mm, and a 9mm), and also own an XDM 9MM. My groups on the 1911 are tight I've been shooting them for 20+ years. About 8-9 years ago I bought the XDM which was my first tupperware gun and learned to shoot it but my groups are just slightly looser at all ranges than the 1911. I think there's just a different feel to the pistol but by looser I go from a half-dollar size group at 25 feet to a silver dollar group. So it's not an extreme difference. I bought the Glock because I found it unshot but privately owned for $400 and I have shot my dads smaller framed Glock 19 which is a fun gun to shoot. I also have thought the Glock and XDms are fairly similar and expected a reasonably similar experience.

Not surprisingly the glocks 10MM rounds are a lot hotter than the 9 and like I said I shoot 10mm out of a 1911 and have nice tight consistent groups. But on the lighter Glock 20 10mm I am all over the place shooting this thing. Literally on the silhouette I cant hit it center of mass to save my life, except by accident. Frustrated after a box of 50 I brought it home checked it with a laser bore sight, it appears dead on.

Went back and sand bag shot it. A little better but still all over the flippen place. At this point I have got to be either gripping it wrong, or sighting it wrong. It is a super stock pistol, nothing has been done to it, and it does not give me any reason to think something is wrong with the firearm, its got to be something with me.

So glock guys, where should I start troubleshooting? I have been gripping it basically the same as my other pistols right hand high as possible, palm gripped with loose thumb, left hand on the grip fingers locked on top of right fingers with index finger up to the bottom of the trigger guard, both palms on the grips, both thumbs loose and pointing up to left, in an isosceles stance. When I sand bag it's similar but seated on the bench buried in the bag.
Having taught on military and civilian ranges for years, my gut is telling me it’s what others have said - trigger control, with recoil anticipation. There are a number of ways to drill this out. Here’s my suggestion:

This is a dry-fire drill. Get a snap cap of the right caliber to protect your firing pin. Rack the slide. Take your normal grip and stance that works for you with your other firearms. Slowly squeeze until seer release. LEAVE THE TRIGGER FULLY DEPRESSED. Very slowly release pressure on the trigger until you hear/feel the seer reset, then STOP at that point without releasing full trigger pressure. Take note in the feeling of your hand/hearing where the seer reset point is. Release, and repeat the entire procedure.

After you do that a few hundred times, go to the range and do the same thing with live ammo, EXCEPT when you stop at seer reset, squeeze again with your following shot. Try to pause at each seer reset to fire the next shot. If you accidentally completely release pressure on the trigger, just start at the beginning again.

Does this make sense?
 

Wabujitsu

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Also, don’t be too concerned about not hitting all of your shots into a tiny little target. That of course is great if you can do it, but for self-defense purposes, ALL you have to achieve is hitting a HUGE torso-sized target, somewhere around center mass, at no more than 20 meters. Most self defense engagements take place inside that range. You don’t have to be Jimmy Bond to take out the bad guy; he’s a huge target for you, after working on half-dollar-size groupings.

In a shooting, the guy who gets off the quickest rounds and shoots the most rounds usually perseveres. That doesn’t mean that you can shoot willy-nilly, of course - because you, being the good guy, don’t want to hit innocent targets accidentally. But there’s no breath control, no trigger discipline, and many times there’s not even a sight picture under the heat of battle. With that said, look up some videos of body alignment shooting - where you don’t use the sights to hit your target.
 

Wabujitsu

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I love my Glock 17 (9mm). At first, I was shooting tight groups but low left as you mentioned. Then I learned this is due to a tight grip. I loosened my grip a little and saw much improvement.
I had the EXACT same issue with Glock and XD.
 

Wabujitsu

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Glad you could fix your grip with a little adjustment!! Low left is very common for right handed shooters. So.etimes its grip and sometimes it's a jerky trigger pull or a sympathetic Squeezing of the other three fingers on your right hand tightening as you pull the trigger.
Absolutely; GREAT point! This really came home to me when I started shooting a compound bow. Beginners always grip with the bow hand through the shot, which adversely impacts accuracy. Correct form is to leave your bow hand completely open, the pressure of your draw holding it against your hand. Release the shot with your draw hand leaving your bow hand completely open. That’s why they make a wrist strap for the bow hand, so you don’t drop the bow.

The same principle somewhat applies with pistol grip. A death grip screws up the impact point. A firm but pliable grip that allows muzzle flip is the sweet spot.
 

Billet_JLU

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If you like to tinker polish up the internals for the trigger, I like how my 19 feels after that.
 

                           


































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