Gas in the 2.0T - Is my understanding correct?

tts42572

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I know this has beaten to death and I apologize. But I was totally unaware of the whole premium gas issue with the 2.0 Turbo when I placed my JLUR order a few weeks ago and now I'm kinda kicking myself as I might've gotten the 3.6 had I known I'd have to deal with this. Maybe at the end of the day using premium might not be a big deal if you can get better gas mileage with the 2.0 versus the 3.6 but that might be debatable. It seems like reported MPG are all over the board but seems like generally the 2.0 does at least a couple MPG better than the 3.6 on average so maybe that helps offset some of the premium cost.

Anyways, been doing a lot of reading on how these Turbo engines work and reading threads in this forum. It seems people are all over the board with the fuel they're using. I posted a poll in another thread and seems like about 2 out of 3 people are using premium in their 2.0 T engines. But there are many who say they just use 87 and everything is peachy. But IMO, just because you don't notice anything being different doesn't mean different things aren't happening in the engine.

I know the manual says the 87 octane can be used in the engine but that 91 is recommended for optimal performance for hotter temps or when engine is taxed at all. My understanding is that when lower octane gas is used, the engine has systems that will work to compensate for the lower octane gas. But when those systems have to be put to work, your sapping resources from the engine and maybe losing some power/efficiency that may or may not be noticeable depending on what's going on.

So while the engine can run fine on 87 octane gas, it has to do some extra work to run on that gas to try and protect itself from early combustion from using that lower octane gas. If you use 91 octane gas, the engine senses it doesn't have to work so hard to protect against early combustion thereby allowing it to operate at peak performance.

Are my understandings correct?

Have these 2.0T engines been around long enough to know if they'll be fine running 87 gas for say 5-6 years and 100K miles or something? Or are you setting the engine up for some problems with more maintenance needed down the road that maybe could've been avoided by just running higher octane gas?

Obviously, nobody wants to throw money away and buy higher octane gas if it isn't needed. Determining the need is the tough part!

It seems like generally that from what I've read that Turbocharged engines generally like higher octane gas due to the way they operate. I think with all the reading I've done, my plan is to probably use premium of some sort as I plan to keep the vehicle for at least 5-6 years and maybe longer. I'd really kick myself if I skimped on 87 gas and needed a bunch of engine work 4 or 5 years down the road because knocking sensors are worn out or something. I don't want to buy this awesome vehicle for 55K or whatever and skimp on the gas I'm putting in it.

Still kicking myself a little as I probably would've gotten the 3.6 has I known this. Should've done better research I guess. But at the end of the day, it'll probably come out pretty close since the 3.6 would've cost me $1,500 more. Guess it's just a matter of spending more up front or spending more $300 a year more for gas over the next 5 years. So I guess it doesn't really matter much. I initially thought I'd be saving money with the 2.0 but guess not.





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Chupacabra

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My 2021 owner's manual says same as what you posted.

This engine is designed to meet all emission requirements, and provide satisfactory fuel economy and performance, when using high-quality unleaded “regular” gasoline having an octane rating of 87, as specified by the (R+M)/2 method. The use of 91 or higher octane “premium” gasoline will allow these engines to operate to optimal performance. This increase in performance is most noticeable in hot weather or other heavier load conditions, such as while towing.

I am putting Premium in mine because I'm in Colorado and "regular" gasoline here is 85 octane and premium is 91 and I usually fill up at Costco where Premium isn't much more than mid-grade elsewhere. But according to manual 87 is fine for normal driving. If I fill up somewhere with mid-grade 87, I will try that too but I doubt I'm going to notice any difference.
 

Twojayhawks

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Well I researched the heck out of it & quite deliberately chose the 2.0L. I'm an old guy & my style of driving is easy & I won't be taxing the engine at all. If you plan to tow I suppose that's another consideration. Ordered mine in late July & it's expected at the dealership next week (I'm told) a little earlier than expected. In test drives I found it had plenty of power without standing on the gas pedal all the time.
 

TimnTexas

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I think the 2.0 runs fine on either grade of fuel. The folks who use 93, like myself, are only trying to get higher performance out of the engine. The turbo delivers insane Low end torque in comparison to the 3.6 and the higher octane will just ensure you get maximum potential through higher boost and better timing. The engine can monitor and adjust to octane rating.
And to be honest...I have never put anything lower than 93 in the Jeep. So I don’t have basis to speak to lower octane, but I believe it is fine. I have always been trying to squeeze maximum performance out of any engine, so I am fine paying more for 93, especially because I don’t drive much per year and the mpg is great on the 2.0.
 
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tts42572

tts42572

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I'm an old guy too lol! Also won't be taxing the engine much and this thing will be mostly just daily driving. I won't be towing anything. I've just always wanted a Jeep Wrangler and finally getting around to getting one.

What fuel you planning to use?

I guess my thing is that I know people say they can use 87 and not notice any difference. But just because you don't notice it doesn't mean the engine isn't working harder to try and keep it so you don't notice it....If that makes any sense?

I think I'm planning to run premium. My choice is only 93 in my area so I'm thinking I use that for the piece of mind. I'm debating if maybe I could alternate some 89 in occasionally to save a few cents and keep my mixture generally around that 91 recommended range.


Well I researched the heck out of it & quite deliberately chose the 2.0L. I'm an old guy & my style of driving is easy & I won't be taxing the engine at all. If you plan to tow I suppose that's another consideration. Ordered mine in late July & it's expected at the dealership next week (I'm told) a little earlier than expected. In test drives I found it had plenty of power without standing on the gas pedal all the time.
 

Twojayhawks

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I'm old AND cheap so I plan to feed it 87. I suppose I'll pry open my wallet if I really think it needs the higher octane. This is my first Jeep (any model) & I'm more excited to get it than any vehicle I recall. I've had nothing but luxo SUV's or cars & everyone said I'd hate the Wrangler. Loved it. Loved the high driving position, loved the huge windows with great visibility, and it's relatively petite size. We also RV so I'll be outfitting it to be pulled behind our motorhome.
 

scottedontknow

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I know this has beaten to death and I apologize. But I was totally unaware of the whole premium gas issue with the 2.0 Turbo when I placed my JLUR order a few weeks ago and now I'm kinda kicking myself as I might've gotten the 3.6 had I known I'd have to deal with this. Maybe at the end of the day using premium might not be a big deal if you can get better gas mileage with the 2.0 versus the 3.6 but that might be debatable. It seems like reported MPG are all over the board but seems like generally the 2.0 does at least a couple MPG better than the 3.6 on average so maybe that helps offset some of the premium cost.

Anyways, been doing a lot of reading on how these Turbo engines work and reading threads in this forum. It seems people are all over the board with the fuel they're using. I posted a poll in another thread and seems like about 2 out of 3 people are using premium in their 2.0 T engines. But there are many who say they just use 87 and everything is peachy. But IMO, just because you don't notice anything being different doesn't mean different things aren't happening in the engine.

I know the manual says the 87 octane can be used in the engine but that 91 is recommended for optimal performance for hotter temps or when engine is taxed at all. My understanding is that when lower octane gas is used, the engine has systems that will work to compensate for the lower octane gas. But when those systems have to be put to work, your sapping resources from the engine and maybe losing some power/efficiency that may or may not be noticeable depending on what's going on.

So while the engine can run fine on 87 octane gas, it has to do some extra work to run on that gas to try and protect itself from early combustion from using that lower octane gas. If you use 91 octane gas, the engine senses it doesn't have to work so hard to protect against early combustion thereby allowing it to operate at peak performance.

Are my understandings correct?

Have these 2.0T engines been around long enough to know if they'll be fine running 87 gas for say 5-6 years and 100K miles or something? Or are you setting the engine up for some problems with more maintenance needed down the road that maybe could've been avoided by just running higher octane gas?

Obviously, nobody wants to throw money away and buy higher octane gas if it isn't needed. Determining the need is the tough part!

It seems like generally that from what I've read that Turbocharged engines generally like higher octane gas due to the way they operate. I think with all the reading I've done, my plan is to probably use premium of some sort as I plan to keep the vehicle for at least 5-6 years and maybe longer. I'd really kick myself if I skimped on 87 gas and needed a bunch of engine work 4 or 5 years down the road because knocking sensors are worn out or something. I don't want to buy this awesome vehicle for 55K or whatever and skimp on the gas I'm putting in it.

Still kicking myself a little as I probably would've gotten the 3.6 has I known this. Should've done better research I guess. But at the end of the day, it'll probably come out pretty close since the 3.6 would've cost me $1,500 more. Guess it's just a matter of spending more up front or spending more $300 a year more for gas over the next 5 years. So I guess it doesn't really matter much. I initially thought I'd be saving money with the 2.0 but guess not.

saying the engine needs to work harder or run extra stuff is kind of not really the case lol. the knock sensor listens for pings (louder in 87) and will advance or retard the engines timing accordingly. its really not doing any extra work that will result in catastrophic failure. what you will notice with 87 is a slight knock or ping and this is NOTHING TO WORRY ABOUT (unless its crazy loud but at that point you have other issues) running 87 is perfectly fine for daily driving. you defiantly want to run 91 if your towing or in a really hot area. Also just remember that when your switching from 87 to 91 or the opposite it will take AT LEAST 2-3 tanks of gas for the engine to fully adjust itself!!!! so IMO going from 87 to 91 all the time is an awful idea stick to one. I've been running 87 on my 2.0t that is now pushing 31k miles and I'm still getting 24-26 mph and she runs like a champ. I think the truly biggest issue is not with the gas its the oil, I never go more than 3.5k on change, sludge is what yall should be worrying about lol.
 

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I run ethanol free 91 in all my vehicles here on Maui. I provides a slight increase in mpg and seems to run very well. It's usually very warm here, I don't know what effect that has but ethanol free works well. It also has a better shelf life, I store some for generator and small engine use.
 

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If you don't plan on towing and have no intention of driving like a teenager hell bent on winning the imaginary prize for first place, then you'll be perfectly fine tuning on 87 octane from any tier 1 brand (I use Mobil).

91 or 93 is for towing weight and/or high rpm accelerating. Situations that are putting a higher than normal load on the motor, thus requiring optimum performance.

Sleep well tts42572, you made a great choice and you're really gonna love your new Jeep! Congratulations!
 

scottedontknow

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Yeah, totally ignore the sound of predetonation, that’s completely fine for the longevity of the motor lol
i mean instead of trolling and not actually adding anything of use to the post, maybe say nothing at all but anyway.....

As per the OWNERS MANUAL...
" While operating on gasoline with the required octane number, hearing a light knocking sound from the engine is not a cause for concern. However, if the engine is heard making a heavy knocking sound, see your dealer immediately. Use of gasoline with a lower than recommended octane number can cause engine failure and may void or not be covered by the New Vehicle Limited Warranty. "

Again a light knock/tap it normal when timing is advanced and nothing to worry about as the engine will correct itself. Anything that will harm the engine will throw a code way before a catastrophic failure would occur...........
 

scottedontknow

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If you don't plan on towing and have no intention of driving like a teenager hell bent on winning the imaginary prize for first place, then you'll be perfectly fine tuning on 87 octane from any tier 1 brand (I use Mobil).

91 or 93 is for towing weight and/or high rpm accelerating. Situations that are putting a higher than normal load on the motor, thus requiring optimum performance.

Sleep well tts42572, you made a great choice and you're really gonna love your new Jeep! Congratulations!
This!!!!! I couldn't agree more with this, I own 4 jeeps at this point and I am absolutely in love with my 2.0t JLU so much so my wife and i ended up getting his and hers JLU's haha! The 2.0t is a fantastic motor im already in 31k on mine and would do the exact same thing if i were to do it all over again (for a third time at this point lol)
 

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This!!!!! I couldn't agree more with this, I own 4 jeeps at this point and I am absolutely in love with my 2.0t JLU so much so my wife and i ended up getting his and hers JLU's haha! The 2.0t is a fantastic motor im already in 31k on mine and would do the exact same thing if i were to do it all over again (for a third time at this point lol)
Just threw this in another thread a minute ago, but it also applies to your post. Lol

Happy Jeeping, to your Jeeper family!
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BigGreen

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i mean instead of trolling and not actually adding anything of use to the post, maybe say nothing at all but anyway.....
Telling people to ignore knock is irresponsible. Knock is bad for an engine, even if the ecu adjusts. The event happened and you can’t undo that. Saving a few bucks a year in gas is going to cost an engine down the line.
 

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I run what the manufacturer states is required. I use straight 87 octane, and I’ve yet to hear any knock or ping. IF I was going to be in 100+ temps continually OR if I was towing near maximum loads I might reconsider depending on IF I heard anything unusual. Barring that I’ll stick with what works well, 87. Bottom line is that 87 has more btu/gallon than “premium”. Premium has additives to prevent pre-ignition. If there is no pre-ignition, why pay extra for what your engine doesn’t need?
 

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