Factory Alpine speaker impedance

Captain Obvious

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I've searched and searched for this, but I cannot find it anywhere. Can someone put a multimeter on the factory installed 3.5 speakers from an Alpine equipped JL and advise what the impedance is? I have seen that many people are installing the Infinity reference speakers, but I'm curious as to if the perceived improvement that these speakers provide is due at least in part to their 3 ohm impedance.
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Mine are sitting on a shelf since I replaced them, so I stuck my multimeter on to see. The 4" knee panel speakers are 2 ohm, and the 3.5" dash top speakers are 4 ohm.

I didn't care for the Infinity reference speakers when I swapped out the dash ones, and ended up going back to stock temporarily until I could get something better. The Infinitys may be a little louder, but to me they unbalanced the system's stock tune and reduced overall sound quality.
 
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Captain Obvious

Captain Obvious

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Mine are sitting on a shelf since I replaced them, so I stuck my multimeter on to see. The 4" knee panel speakers are 2 ohm, and the 3.5" dash top speakers are 4 ohm.

I didn't care for the Infinity reference speakers when I swapped out the dash ones, and ended up going back to stock temporarily until I could get something better. The Infinitys may be a little louder, but to me they unbalanced the system's stock tune and reduced overall sound quality.
Great info, thank you! The unbalanced sound makes sense since it’s replacing a 4 ohm with a 3 ohm. It’s going to be louder just due to that.
Thanks!
 

Fire Burns

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Not a stereo dude or audiophile, but don't they make inline impedance modules that can increase an 3 ohm speaker to 4 ohm? This is probably a totally dumb question...
 

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Mine are sitting on a shelf since I replaced them, so I stuck my multimeter on to see. The 4" knee panel speakers are 2 ohm, and the 3.5" dash top speakers are 4 ohm.

I didn't care for the Infinity reference speakers when I swapped out the dash ones, and ended up going back to stock temporarily until I could get something better. The Infinitys may be a little louder, but to me they unbalanced the system's stock tune and reduced overall sound quality.
I know this is an old post but based on the 4ohm knee panel and the 2ohm dash speaker, I believe that although wired separately that they are part of the same channel and the highs and lows are separated at the amp like a crossover. This would lead me to believe that the overall ohm load for the channel is 3ohm. That being said.... If adding or upgrading speakers, it would make sense to use 2 - 4ohm speakers mid and high, and that should push a 2ohm load on the amp that would give them a little more juice without over taxing the amp. I've heard of people complaining about replacing the overhead speakers with 6.5 coaxial and it sounded weak and muffled until they connected both 4" woofer lead and 3.5" tweeter speaker leads to the 1 coaxial speaker which I believe gives it the full range, wattage and a 2ohm load giving it a more wattage and sound better. I think the same applies to the front speaker set. Optimally a 6.5" coaxial and a 3.5 coaxial at 4ohm each should give a nice 2ohm load for more wattage. However I think a full range coaxial may be a waste in both location given that the highs and lows are already separated. May be better off with a 6.5" component set but just not use the Crossover. Install the 6.5 in the adapter pod and the 1" tweeter in the dash with an adapter. Anyone wanna chime in?
 

Gaust

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I know this is an old post but based on the 4ohm knee panel and the 2ohm dash speaker, I believe that although wired separately that they are part of the same channel and the highs and lows are separated at the amp like a crossover. This would lead me to believe that the overall ohm load for the channel is 3ohm. That being said.... If adding or upgrading speakers, it would make sense to use 2 - 4ohm speakers mid and high, and that should push a 2ohm load on the amp that would give them a little more juice without over taxing the amp. I've heard of people complaining about replacing the overhead speakers with 6.5 coaxial and it sounded weak and muffled until they connected both 4" woofer lead and 3.5" tweeter speaker leads to the 1 coaxial speaker which I believe gives it the full range, wattage and a 2ohm load giving it a more wattage and sound better. I think the same applies to the front speaker set. Optimally a 6.5" coaxial and a 3.5 coaxial at 4ohm each should give a nice 2ohm load for more wattage. However I think a full range coaxial may be a waste in both location given that the highs and lows are already separated. May be better off with a 6.5" component set but just not use the Crossover. Install the 6.5 in the adapter pod and the 1" tweeter in the dash with an adapter. Anyone wanna chime in?
I’ve been wondering if the OEM amp in the Alpine and the standard system outputs a processed signal. If it does then you will not get good sound from a full range speaker, by using just one set of wires.
I would not recommend a component set without the crossovers, unless you have a dsp and amplifiers to go fully active. The crossovers are designed to provide correct frequencies to the midrange and tweeter. If you didn’t use the crossover you’d more than likely fry the tweeter.
 

emoody007

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I’ve been wondering if the OEM amp in the Alpine and the standard system outputs a processed signal. If it does then you will not get good sound from a full range speaker, by using just one set of wires.
I would not recommend a component set without the crossovers, unless you have a dsp and amplifiers to go fully active. The crossovers are designed to provide correct frequencies to the midrange and tweeter. If you didn’t use the crossover you’d more than likely fry the tweeter.
But each speaker isn't a full range speaker so it seems like the signal is already processed off the amp. People have had good results using both leads in the sound bar on a full range speaker because they are getting both mid and high at a lower ohm and the speaker itself has passive crossovers for the woofer and the tweeter that are part of the full range. By combining the wires from the 4" woofer and 3.5" tweeter you are essentially making 1 full range signal to that speaker. Unless each signal off the amp is full range and each one speaker has a filter I'm assuming that each set of wires to each speaker are pre filtered for the range of that speaker. If that's the case I would consider a component setup but their would be no need for the crossover.
 

Gaust

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But each speaker isn't a full range speaker so it seems like the signal is already processed off the amp. People have had good results using both leads in the sound bar on a full range speaker because they are getting both mid and high at a lower ohm and the speaker itself has passive crossovers for the woofer and the tweeter that are part of the full range. By combining the wires from the 4" woofer and 3.5" tweeter you are essentially making 1 full range signal to that speaker. Unless each signal off the amp is full range and each one speaker has a filter I'm assuming that each set of wires to each speaker are pre filtered for the range of that speaker. If that's the case I would consider a component setup but their would be no need for the crossover.
If the signal is split between the 4” woofer and the 3.5” speaker you’d need to know at what frequency the crossover is at. Most component tweeters can only play down to 2-3 kHz, some higher. If the factory 3.5” is crossed over lower than that you will destroy the aftermarket tweeter. If I had to guess the frequency is lower than an aftermarket tweeter could handle with out a passive crossover.
Has anyone pulled out the 4” woofer from the dash pod and checked for a passive crossover? The 3.5” dash speaker does have a passive capacitor cutting off the low frequencies.
If you want to keep the factory amp and replace the speakers I’d suggest finding a 6.5” woofer for the lower dash and a 2” to 3.5” full range or a 3.5” coax speaker for the dash. I plan on trying to use the Audiofrog GS25 speaker in the dash of a 2 way active system.
 

Gaust

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If people have had success combining the wires for the 4” and 3.5” for a full range signal I’d suggest doing that. Connect the full range signal to the component passive crossover, then the woofer and tweeter to the crossover.
 

emoody007

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If the signal is split between the 4” woofer and the 3.5” speaker you’d need to know at what frequency the crossover is at. Most component tweeters can only play down to 2-3 kHz, some higher. If the factory 3.5” is crossed over lower than that you will destroy the aftermarket tweeter. If I had to guess the frequency is lower than an aftermarket tweeter could handle with out a passive crossover.
Has anyone pulled out the 4” woofer from the dash pod and checked for a passive crossover? The 3.5” dash speaker does have a passive capacitor cutting off the low frequencies.
If you want to keep the factory amp and replace the speakers I’d suggest finding a 6.5” woofer for the lower dash and a 2” to 3.5” full range or a 3.5” coax speaker for the dash. I plan on trying to use the Audiofrog GS25 speaker in the dash of a 2 way active system.
Makes sense. I didn't realize the existing the tweet had a passive cross.
 

StockRubi

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With 4ohm in the dash, any thoughts on the JL c2-350x. They are 4ohm and well.
 
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