EPA MPG numbers published for 2.0L Turbo Wrangler JL

kiwi

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Now add a battery pack next year and the JLU will fly. My BMW 225xe goes from 7.5 seconds engine only to 5.8 0-62mph using both engine and battery together. I will wait another 2 years before I'll look at buying.





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Joe

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All new vehicles have their engine timing, fuel delivery, etc., controlled by computers. When you use regular fuel, the computer compensates for the lower octane by adjusting those. The negative part is, by the computer compensating for the lower grade fuel, your engine will not make as much power (picture the 3.6 V6 wizzing on by you), your clock times will increase, and your mpg will usually increase as well. I've had many turbocharged cars starting way back with the 1984 Pontiac Turbo 2000 Sunfire SE, a Buick Regal GS (Supercharged), and even a 2003 Mitsubishi Evolution (kick ass car), so I know about turbocharging. I actually prefer Supercharging and have been considering installing the Edelbrock E-Force Supercharger on my 2013 10A Rubicon. That engine set up would just run circles around any Jeep factory engine option except the TrackHawk which you can't take offroad. That vehicle is basically a Hellcat in different Jeep clothing. I recently owned a BMW 335xi that required premium fuel as it was turbocharged as well. Loved the car, it's everything great that you read about, except the maintenance costs will eat you alive. Everytime I took my BMW in for service, I spent a minimum of $1100 EVERY TIME! I traded that BMW for the 2018 Ford Escape Titanium with the 2.0 turbo and have been totally happy ever since.
Now I'm just waiting for my new Rubicon to be built.
Oh, I forgot to mention that I've had NOS setups on some of my cars as well. Fantastic performance but the bitch is you have to refill and pay for, the nitrous. That got old fast. I sure had a blast with my car running on nitrous though. Maybe that would be something to consider on the 3.6?
I had a supercharged LT1 Fbody and would never consider centrifugal for a jeep, not even a roots style twin screw...still directly related to engine RPM and less efficient as well.
 

56nomad56

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Checked prices today. Ladera Ranch, CA ARCO:

Regular (87): $3.69
Mid (89): $3.79
Premium (91): $3.89

Difference of $0.20/gallon is an increase of 5.4%. As some others posted, paying an extra 70-80 cents per gallon for premium would not make financial sense. If premium stays $0.20/gallon higher than regular, as gas prices increase the difference in percentage decreases and the 2.0T is easier to justify w/ regards to efficiency (obviously only one of the factors to consider).
 

GARRIGA

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2.0 gets 33% better city mileage. That’s significant. Unless you don’t spend much time city driving. I do. Linear low end torque. Priceless.

Only better option I’m seeing is diesel. Still trying to figure that one out, however.
 

Covfefe

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30 cents more in the tax free army base, and 45+ cents more everywhere else here, and good luck trying to stay under boost in NYC. You won't even make it to the next light accelerating that slow.
 

GARRIGA

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30 cents more in the tax free army base, and 45+ cents more everywhere else here, and good luck trying to stay under boost in NYC. You won't even make it to the next light accelerating that slow.
Used to work in NYC. Never understood why anyone drove. I walked faster. Lol
 

Covfefe

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Used to work in NYC. Never understood why anyone drove. I walked faster. Lol
That would make sense if you lived in the borough of Manhattan, but those that drive usually live just outside of it. Nobody wants to take public transportation with the rest of the non car owning peasants.
 

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Not all peasants are non car owning. ;)
 

Ribixcon

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About the fuel “upgrades”...
A higher octane will resist “exploding” when getting compressed in your cilinders a bit better then a lower octane. You want it to explode at the perfect time, initiated by your timing and spark plug.
If your engine does not compress very much, nothing (bad) happens with either fuel. The fuel air mixture does not explode prior to your sparks timing... perfect.
If you have a high compression type engine (either by design or through turbo or compressor install) there could be an issue with low octane fuel igniting prior to the perfect moment, (when your piston is still traveling ‘up’ compressing the fuel air mixture). So compression is igniting the fuel, not the spark (that’s how diesel engines work, diesel octane is low 40). So that’s when a higher octane fuel resist ignition during compression and waits for the spark so to say.
Putting a high octane fuel in a lower compression engine does absolutely nothing. Nothing will run better or happen differently.
It’s like spraying your mufler wet while your driving in the summer to keep it cool . It wasn’t a problem to begin with. The preventive action is not going to make anything better.
Putting high octane gas (premium gas) in an engine that does not require is, is a waste of money.
I hope this helps to save some people some $ to buy extra upgrades for their new JL :)
 

Joe

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About the fuel “upgrades”...
A higher octane will resist “exploding” when getting compressed in your cilinders a bit better then a lower octane. You want it to explode at the perfect time, initiated by your timing and spark plug.
If your engine does not compress very much, nothing (bad) happens with either fuel. The fuel air mixture does not explode prior to your sparks timing... perfect.
If you have a high compression type engine (either by design or through turbo or compressor install) there could be an issue with low octane fuel igniting prior to the perfect moment, (when your piston is still traveling ‘up’ compressing the fuel air mixture). So compression is igniting the fuel, not the spark (that’s how diesel engines work, diesel octane is low 40). So that’s when a higher octane fuel resist ignition during compression and waits for the spark so to say.
Putting a high octane fuel in a lower compression engine does absolutely nothing. Nothing will run better or happen differently.
It’s like spraying your mufler wet while your driving in the summer to keep it cool . It wasn’t a problem to begin with. The preventive action is not going to make anything better.
Putting high octane gas (premium gas) in an engine that does not require is, is a waste of money.
I hope this helps to save some people some $ to buy extra upgrades for their new JL :)
Higher compression benefits from higher octane, as well as vehicles with advanced timing. I have to run 93 in my Mustang or risk the consequences due to the tune it is running.
 

Ribixcon

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Higher compression benefits from higher octane, as well as vehicles with advanced timing. I have to run 93 in my Mustang or risk the consequences due to the tune it is running.
I think we are in agreement here. So If your compression requires higher octane I would say a low octane is going to give bad results. High octane is not going to give “better” results then expected from the engine. Just better then an incorrect low octane fuel for that engine. In other words: getting an even higher octane fuel will not make it “even better”. You run the engine with the fuel it requires. Higher is a waste of money, lower will give bad results.
Jeeps require regular.
 

Joe

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I think we are in agreement here. So If your compression requires higher octane I would say a low octane is going to give bad results. High octane is not going to give “better” results then expected from the engine. Just better then an incorrect low octane fuel for that engine. In other words: getting an even higher octane fuel will not make it “even better”. You run the engine with the fuel it requires. Higher is a waste of money, lower will give bad results.
Jeeps require regular.
Pentastar Jeeps require regular, the 2.0 requires 91 (unless you are willing to risk it). We do agree that higher octane has no performance benefit in and of itself, but allows more timing and higher compression ratios that produce more power, without detonation/preignition.
 

Ribixcon

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Pentastar Jeeps require regular, the 2.0 requires 91 (unless you are willing to risk it). We do agree that higher octane has no performance benefit in and of itself, but allows more timing and higher compression ratios that produce more power, without detonation/preignition.
 

Ribixcon

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Totally agree.
 

GARRIGA

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My FJ ran on 87 but ran better on 93. More felt power. Better mpg. Don’t know what the compression was. Just know what I saw and noticed.
 

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