Eco Diesel and Tunes

Beowulf

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What tunes do you expect to see with the new Eco Diesel? Honestly, it has so much power, I'm hoping for a Economy tune. But, I'm betting someone will come out with tunes that allow on the fly switching between power and eco.





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Tcijoe

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I hope there is an emission delete like there are for the diesel trucks.
 

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Crux

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What tunes do you expect to see with the new Eco Diesel? Honestly, it has so much power, I'm hoping for a Economy tune. But, I'm betting someone will come out with tunes that allow on the fly switching between power and eco.
You’re in luck

The 3.0d comes with an extremely economical tune
 

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I've been hearing about the epa working in conjunction with the dot to set up random roadside inspection stations specifically for targeting all those that are running off highway engine equipment. With all the nitwits rolling coal all over the interweb, it was just a matter of time. Supposedly, some of the bigger names in diesel tuning have chosen to work with the epa, so as to keep their doors open versus a cease and desist.
 

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JLURD

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I expect none, EPA has new laws prohibiting any modifications, along with heavy fines for violators.

Reference : https://www.epa.gov/sites/productio...rmarket-defeat-devices-2019-mcdi-mtg-33pp.pdf
There are already companies that have made EPA compliant tunes for other diesels. They obviously don’t delete the EGR/DPF/SCR, but they are able to squeeze significant torque and throttle response without running afoul of the emissions regs. I still expect to see tuning options that are switchable between eco and power. There will also be plenty of folks getting Canadian tunes which allow hardware deletes.
 
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Beowulf

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Wait. Canada allows deletes legally?
 

JLURD

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Wait. Canada allows deletes legally?
Yea they’re technically still off-road tunes like the US standard before the EPA went after that market, but their shops are still doing them without issue. In theory, you won’t even have to travel to that terrible country for the tune either...ship them your ECU and they ship back a tuned ECU.
 

MCJA

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@Beowulf , if efficiency and MPGs are your goal, I don't think you'll be disappointed with the stock tune. The 3.0L EcoDiesel already boasts the highest fuel economy rating of any Wrangler to date. EPA figures aren't released yet, but media coverage and hints from FCA point at the 30 MPG mark.

As far as tunes and mods are concerned... Personally, I think "rolling coal" is an abomination. I just don't understand why someone would think it's "cool" or "badass" to intentionally create additional pollution just for the fun of it. The whole reason I have a Jeep is to get out into nature, not destroy it.

For me, 260 HP and 442 lb-ft of torque is plenty. The requisite 8-speed auto trans also makes a world of difference in terms of performance - for both miles per gallon and smiles per gallon. I just don't see the benefit of spending thousands of dollars for 5-10% gain in performance (at best) and 5-100% increases in pollution.

Best bang for the buck, IMO, is a throttle response mod - like the Pedal Commander. It doesn't change your tune, it just reduces (or eliminates entirely) the artificial delay between your go-pedal and the engine. You get all the power and torque the engine has to offer without waiting for the computer to "allow" you to have it. No warranty violations, no EPA violations, no expensive components, no degradation of engine reliability. (Although, if you have a heavy foot, your driveline reliability may suffer. But that would be true with a bunch of engine mods too.)

Second best mod is a free-breathing air filter and/or cold air intake. Anything you can do to get more filtered air (both volume and density) is a benefit. The stock tune will keep you running at the optimal stoichiometric ratio. More air = more oxygen = more fuel = more power/torque. Same emissions (percentage-wise, not volume-wise). It's like going from 7,000 elevation to sea level.

And by the way, an exposed filter (no box) in your engine bay may be higher flow, but it is *not* a cold air intake. Don't be fooled by marketing gimmicks. If it's pulling air from inside your engine bay, it's not any cooler than the stock intake - in fact, it's hotter. Engine bay temps usually run at ~190 degrees. The stock intake drafts air from the side of the hood, bringing in cooler outside air. Best option, IMO, is a high-flow filter in the stock air box or a snorkel. (Although certain snorkel designs may restrict airflow or cause turbulent airflow. Be cognizant of what you're getting.)

Just my $0.02.
 
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Beowulf

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If I even thought this diesel would roll coal accidentally, I wouldn’t want. If I thought a tune could cause it, I wouldn’t install it. More curious what’s out there. I don’t mind sacrificing power for efficiency on those long freeway drives, plus I don’t mind sacrificing mpg when there might be times more power might be needed. Don’t know when that would be with 442. But if blowing black smoke is a risk, I’ll skip it.
 

kre62

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I'm definitely awaiting news on tunes. Will definitely need to kill the throttle delay. And I'd be down with disabling other functions of the system. Sorry, if you think the idiots in government are super smart, and if they say it's bad for the air it must be, you are an idiot who deserves to be taken advantage of.
 

AnnDee4444

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Sounds like a bunch of California..

F466B63F-205F-4AA4-8729-8983C3AE9DB0.jpeg
EPA = Federal

Meanwhile in California: Banks Power just got CARB certification on their Derringer tuner for the 3.0 WK2 Grand Cherokee. I would think that they are working on the JL platform as well.
 

bruno747

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EPA = Federal

Meanwhile in California: Banks Power just got CARB certification on their Derringer tuner for the 3.0 WK2 Grand Cherokee. I would think that they are working on the JL platform as well.
Sure, EPA is federal, but who do they pretty much bend over and hand a jar of vaseline to? CARB. Aka California.

The GDE tunes were well known to increase mileage on the ecodiesel, increase longevity, and in most cases passed emissions too. Plus they took things like the throttle lag out as well as addressed some of the goofy shifting FCA put in place on the 8 speed.

I would really. Like REALLY like to see a genuine, unbiased, all encompassing evaluation of the diesel emissions eco system and see if all the rules diesel have on them is worth it. I mean would the fuel economy gain from unrestricted diesels outweigh the global emissions we emit just to restrict our new diesels and make them eat more fuel?

Think about it, just off the top of my head

  • We created an entire economy: buildings, shipping, manufacturing, mining etc all to create, ship, install, maintain, and recycle additional items for diesel emissions. IE an entire economy that didn't exist as recently as 1998.
  • We have to mine, manufacture, ship, install, and recycle DPF filters. Does all the emissions associated with making a single DPF filter outweigh the soot emissions of the one truck it will be installed on. What about when failures with clogged DPFs are considered, now the emissions just to put a DPF on one truck are 2,3,4 times as high depending on how often it happens.
  • We manufacture and ship DEF all over the world to pour into a truck and cause a chemical reaction in the exhaust to have slightly better emissions. What about the shipping, manufacturing, labs for testing, buildings, warehousing etc? Does the slightly lower emissions outweigh all that?
  • All the extra cabling, wiring, tubing, sensors, etc that have to go onto a new diesel just to make the emissions system "work"
  • We put EGR systems on diesels that soot up the engines and cause additional failures. Same thing, does the emissions associated with recycling a failed engine plus the process of manufacturing them outweigh the minor emissions gains from feeding dirty air back into the engine?
I get there is an economy of scale behind these things, but no matter how I look at it, I can't agree that all the crap we go through just to lower some emissions at the tailpipe are an actual net gain for emissions globally. Especially when after all this crap is installed, the vehicle in question now looses an significant amount of efficiency and often has to have parts replaced.

Now let me be clear in stating that I in no way shape or form agree with rolling coal. Honestly those people are probably 40% of the reason we keep getting additional restrictions.

When tuned correctly and maintained, a diesel puts out a pretty minimal amount of smoke unless towing lots of weight.

If the EPA said hey we are banning tunes, but also removing the requirements for all the extra crap, I would be all for it. But it will never happen. The world has a vendetta against diesel. Its unfortunate but true.

Heck at one point, direct injection gas engines were actually more polluting than "dirty diesels" and yet it took years to finally put restrictions on those. Those restrictions are still cake compared to current diesel rules.

Here is one such study on direct injection gas engines back in 2013, when Def was introduced for diesel engines in the USA. Mind you diesel had DPF filter for around 10 years before this even.

https://www.transportenvironment.org/publications/particle-emissions-petrol-cars
 

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