Gazelle

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I wish the sales guy would have better explained it to me. I did research, but all the information on it was pointing to it needing to be charged daily. I tried looking for information on it and not allot was told on the recharge or regen systems. Well, maybe my next one will be the 4XE as I really did like it at the time, but the diesel one out at the time.
There is so much missing and outright wrong information on this platform, it's not surprising you couldn't find the details you wanted. I've spent (wasted?) countless hours reading and researching about it.

You can absolutely drive it without ever charging, just treating it like a hybrid. It seems that folks have been getting pretty good mileage (~26MPG) in stock configuration with the battery indicating 1%. The advantage here is that it will still use the electric drive when at lower speeds and acceleration levels even when "fully discharged".

Charging daily will definitely yield the best "mileage" and save money assuming your driving habits and electricity costs are average. The purchase price is actually less than a comparably equipped model if you can take advantage of the $7500 tax credit. Ordering early, I was forced to buy the body colored top & fenders and I still saved about $2k over getting a regular gas model.

Imjester77, your diesel is likely to be a long lived, torquey powerplant without many reliability issues. The 4xe longevity and reliability is unknown. It should be great, but I expect teething problems for the first year, and hope it lasts at least as long as the battery warranty (10 years).
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Jeep-4XE

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Vary the speed, pull off the road and sit for ~30 min to let things cool down a couple of times (so it gets multiple heating/cooling cycles). If you're really wanting to worry about that sort of thing.
Thanks for the info. I’ll keep it in mind on my drive back. What is the purpose of cooling down multiple times?
 

woody8476

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Not buying the 4xe to save money on gas cost but I plan to use EV mode for most of my driving, any reason I should NOT use premium at the pump? Considering I’ll be going so long between fill ups I figure it would be better on the ICE. Saw somewhere that the manual specified 87 but there is no reason higher octane would be bad, right?
 
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Kremz

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I'm assuming you know GVW is not how much it weights though, right? If I recall the actual weight is around 5220.
Indeed. I was answering someone’s request for the GVW printed inside the door.

From what I remember GVW is vehicle + passengers + tongue weight + something else I’m missing I think. Essentially the maximum safe weight the vehicle can accommodate including itself before it explodes. 😝
 
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Kremz

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Not buying the 4xe to save money on gas cost but I plan to use EV mode for most of my driving, any reason I should NOT use premium at the pump? Considering I’ll be going so long between fill ups I figure it would be better on the ICE. Saw somewhere that the manual specified 87 but there is no reason higher octane would be bad, right?
There wouldn’t be any reason the higher octane would be bad unless it contained more ethanol technically. Even then modern engines handle it pretty well. Most stations tend to use 10-15% ethanol in their fuels. The best option if available would be ethanol-free (as suggested by @Oilburner) regardless of octane or whatever octane has the lowest gas to ethanol ratio.

I think until one of us can strap a 4xe to a dyno it remains to be seen if there is any performance benefit to higher octane yet and/or if the engine can take advantage.
 

Shasta_Steve

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Not buying the 4xe to save money on gas cost but I plan to use EV mode for most of my driving, any reason I should NOT use premium at the pump? Considering I’ll be going so long between fill ups I figure it would be better on the ICE. Saw somewhere that the manual specified 87 but there is no reason higher octane would be bad, right?
If the engine is really set up to run on 87 then running premium won't hurt but won't help either. Higher octane just keeps the gas from igniting before it is supposed to. Engines with higher compression usually need higher octane. Some engines can adjust for both but prefer higher octane. My Toyota FJ is that way. Most modern cars it does not matter and premium won't give more HP and basically are wasting money.

I believe the regular Wrangler 2.0 is one of those engines that prefer premium but do just fine on regular. I have read that the 4xe engine is a little different and regular is all you need but I am not 100 percent certain of that.
 
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Kremz

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If the engine is really set up to run on 87 then running premium won't hurt but won't help either. Higher octane just keeps the gas from igniting before it is supposed to. Engines with higher compression usually need higher octane. Some engines can adjust for both but prefer higher octane. My Toyota FJ is that way. Most modern cars it does not matter and premium won't give more HP and basically are wasting money.

I believe the regular Wrangler 2.0 is one of those engines that prefer premium but do just fine on regular. I have read that the 4xe engine is a little different and regular is all you need but I am not 100 percent certain of that.
In the specifications brochure that came with the car (that I just noticed) it mentions: “minimum unleaded regular, 87 octane; 91 octane or higher recommended for optimum fuel economy and performance.”

I also (out of curiosity) looked up the official FCA spec docs on the 2.0T and 3.6, the regular 2.0T has the same 87/91 differentiation. The 3.6 only lists 87 and does not list any fuel or performance benefit from 91 or higher.

So. 87 fine, 91+ go vroom. 🚀
 
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Demonic

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The knock sensors will adjust the ignition timing in real-time for either octane. I'm not sure you'd be able to tell a real-world difference in performance or economy.
 

Hakan

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If not knocking it will also allow higher turbo boost. Which do give some more power.
It will play with both boost and ignition. Ignition is the fastest reacting.
Retarded ignition do make fuel consumption worse but it is only momentary.

In cold and moist weather knocking may not occur and you get same power on either octane rating. But if pulling a trailer uphill or hot weather it will ping on lower octane and reduce power.
During normal driving on flat road you will probable not notice though.
 

HungryHound

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Indeed. I was answering someone’s request for the GVW printed inside the door.

From what I remember GVW is vehicle + passengers + tongue weight + something else I’m missing I think. Essentially the maximum safe weight the vehicle can accommodate including itself before it explodes. 😝
I think it's all of the above plus a 6-pack of beer.
 

HungryHound

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I'd be curious to see if using e-save and charging mode will impact fuel economy on long trips.
 

HungryHound

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I'm not sure you can? From what the dealer and even the posts above stated that the battery will drain all the way to 1%. IF that is the case, why plug it in when it should charge the batteries while driving. that is why allot of auto makers will add another generator through the transmission to the to assist with this. or modify the current alternator to output to a separate terminal bank to charge the batteries. Maybe Jeep figured there was not enough room to do this? not sure, but there are PLENTY of Hybrids out there that DO Not need to be plugged in.
Put it in eSave mode and select charging and it will go all Prius on you.
 

HungryHound

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Thank you for sharing, great stuff.

The Tesla parking stares are probably warranted because you can't plug into those! I've driven an EV for over 4 years now, and usually when someone *deliberately* blocks an EV charger it's a large truck (think coal roll) or something like a Wrangler (which pisses me off as a Wrangler owner), so I think a bunch of EV drivers are probably approaching with a guilty-until-proven-innocent mindset. I'm sure there's a bunch of curiosity that follows though, once they realize their error. Nothing else like this out there yet.

Also FYI the locking fuel tank could be because they're pressurizing to extend the life of fuel? BMW i3 does that, although that car goes over 100 miles with only 1-2 gallon fuel capacity, so fuel is used much less. I'd be surprised and somewhat impressed if that's what Jeep was doing here.
We only have one J1772 plug around here. If one of those tiny-pee-pee trucks blocks that, I'll be using my winch.
 

HungryHound

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yes, I am glad it's the steel,steering box. i had read a while back they were moving back to aluminum for the 4xe.

for the steering knuckles i was hoping it would use the Steel ones like the Mojave and I think 492. the 4xe is already using the larger max tow gladiator axles and larger brakes so I was hoping they also added the heavier duty steering knuckles. from what I have read, replacing the knuckles with steel ones like Reid racing etc. makes a big difference in how well the vehicle tracks. I don't think the steering knuckles is near as critical as the steering box though. If you are running 37s or larger the steering knuckles will be more noticeable, but overall I think most should be fine. all 3 of my 3.6 JLURs had the aluminum knuckles with 35s, and it was ok.
Agreed. Only think I ever busted in my TJ offroad besides a tire bead is my sterl steering box. Can't imagine how easy an aluminum one would be to crack.
 
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