DIY Gear Swap - Step by Step Pic's - Rubicon 4.88

RubiRob

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They’re either full of it or I just got lucky. I don’t see how it could possibly matter where the locker actuator is clocked on the diff.
I have no idea. It’s literally what they told me and exactly what they explain in their installation video. They have you Mark the posting before removing it “because there’s no other way.”





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chevymitchell

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The reason you "must" put the plate back where it came from is not because there is only one, right way to re-install it.

It's a pretty standard mechanical expectation and practice that when you remove components, that you put them back exactly the way it came off.

The parts wear in a specific pattern over time. Some parts take longer than others to create this specific wear pattern. Doing a gear swap early in a differentials life, it doesn't matter as much. However, once these gear swaps are being done closer to the 30, 50, 100k mileage range, the more important this practice becomes.

The plate can go on in a few different ways, but it can and will cause an issue. The issue just won't be prevalent in a low mileage, barely exercised locking differential.

If you follow Dana's instruction and advice, you will likely never have a problem. The only time you would discover a problem, if you put the plate on the way it came off, is if you accidentally bent it in any way.

Incorporate the "go back on the way it comes off" practice into your mechanical skill set and you will experience a lot less headaches from weird noise, to premature wear, random lights and disconnects, ...etc. Mechanical quality of life stays high.
 
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RubiRob

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The reason you "must" put the plate back where it came from is not because there is only one, right way to re-install it.

It's a pretty standard mechanical expectation and practice that when you remove components, that you put them back exactly the way it came off.

The parts wear in a specific pattern over time. Some parts take longer than others to create this specific wear pattern. Doing a gear swap early in a differentials life, it doesn't matter as much. However, once these gear swaps are being done closer to the 30, 50, 100k mileage range, the more important this practice becomes.

The plate can go on in a few different ways, but it can and will cause an issue. The issue just won't be prevalent in a low mileage, barely exercised locking differential.

If you follow Dana's instruction and advice, you will likely never have a problem. The only time you would discover a problem, if you put the plate on the way it came off, is if you accidentally bent it in any way.

Incorporate the "go back on the way it comes off" practice into your mechanical skill set and you will experience a lot less headaches from weird noise, to premature wear, random lights and disconnects, ...etc. Mechanical quality of life stays high.
I’m just sharing what Dana said. Mines been fine since it was repositioned.
 
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chevymitchell

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I’m just sharing what Dana said. Mines been fine since it was repositioned.
Sorry, I should have just replied instead of quoting your reply. I went back and removed it. My reply was supposed to be just a general comment.
 

word302

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Yeah I get best practices and all that, I just have a hard time believing that clicking the actuator differently somehow causes a sensory issue.
 

JDickson85

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How did you all hold the pinion flange while torquing the pinion nut crushing the crush sleeve?
 
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chevymitchell

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It must be time for a new impact, I got it down to certain point and it quit moving. Thanks!
All of those crush sleeves are not created equal. Some crush easier than others.

I always keep 3 or 4 new ones on hand because some of them won't crush at all without a ridiculous amount of torque.

I'm actually in the middle of doing gears right now and about 15 minutes ago I put the front pinion sleeve in my press and pressed it down to .050" above the sleeve that came out. I did that just to help the impact crush it the final little bit. They can be a pain.

If you have any extra sleeves, just hammer that pinion out and swap the sleeve out. You'll be surprised how different they are from one install kit to the next.
 
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chevymitchell

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Yeah my rear sleeve didn’t want to crush, I had to keep at it. Once it starts it’s usually easy going from there.
Very true. That's why I pre-crush them now.
 

oceanblue2019

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The reason you "must" put the plate back where it came from is not because there is only one, right way to re-install it.

It's a pretty standard mechanical expectation and practice that when you remove components, that you put them back exactly the way it came off.

The parts wear in a specific pattern over time. Some parts take longer than others to create this specific wear pattern. Doing a gear swap early in a differentials life, it doesn't matter as much. However, once these gear swaps are being done closer to the 30, 50, 100k mileage range, the more important this practice becomes.

The plate can go on in a few different ways, but it can and will cause an issue. The issue just won't be prevalent in a low mileage, barely exercised locking differential.

If you follow Dana's instruction and advice, you will likely never have a problem. The only time you would discover a problem, if you put the plate on the way it came off, is if you accidentally bent it in any way.

Incorporate the "go back on the way it comes off" practice into your mechanical skill set and you will experience a lot less headaches from weird noise, to premature wear, random lights and disconnects, ...etc. Mechanical quality of life stays high.
Too add to this - if it's not keyed to go back in only one way witness marks are your friend.
 
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chevymitchell

chevymitchell

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Too add to this - if it's not keyed to go back in only one way witness marks are your friend.
Exactly. Step 76 in the step-by-step has you do this. There's a pic in there somewhere, too.

I use a black or red sharpe. Mark with a Zero and an "X". I've also started to incorporate a 3rd mark that looks like 3 lines. You can use whatever you want, but witness marks are super handy. You could etch it, as well.
 

JDickson85

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All of those crush sleeves are not created equal. Some crush easier than others.

I always keep 3 or 4 new ones on hand because some of them won't crush at all without a ridiculous amount of torque.

I'm actually in the middle of doing gears right now and about 15 minutes ago I put the front pinion sleeve in my press and pressed it down to .050" above the sleeve that came out. I did that just to help the impact crush it the final little bit. They can be a pain.

If you have any extra sleeves, just hammer that pinion out and swap the sleeve out. You'll be surprised how different they are from one install kit to the next.
I’ll have to try the press trick. I don’t have any extras so if this don’t work I’ll have to order some more. I build a deal to hold the pinion flange using bolts in the non threaded holes of flange. 3 ft cheater won’t budge it. Just bends the bolts in half. I still have 1/16” of play in the bearings so I’m assuming it has to be the crush sleeve. Thanks for the help!
 

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