Consumer Reports review of the 2018 Wrangler JL

JEEPJL

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The top 5 worst vehicles on the planet have Jeep in it ...............The top 5 most popular vehicles sold on the planet has Jeep in it

Its not a Caddy , Its not an SUV , Its not a sports Car ..............Its a JEEP ! you cant compare it to anything so its hard to rate it

not the best on MPG , comfort , towing but they've been making them for 77 years !!
 

MikeM1968

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From what I recall - CR pretty much hates any American brand name vehicles- Love the ricers though - clearly biased

My advice? Take those articles with a big grain of salt Use the page(s) for fireplace kindling or puppy training pads- possibly temporary floor mats ;)
 

Jeepster2018

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This was not their actual review, it was just a preview.


https://www.yahoo.com/amphtml/news/...ocial-sh&soc_trk=tw&__twitter_impression=true

"Redesigning the Jeep Wrangler is a delicate job. Designers have to honor its history and respect its loyal owner base, while addressing significant shortcomings in a marketplace that has seen dramatic evolution since the last version was introduced back in 2006.

The template is clear: Make improvements throughout, but don’t change the silhouette.

Judging by the four-door Wrangler Unlimited Sahara we recently purchased, Jeep seems to have successfully performed this tricky feat. As our testers drive the Wrangler during its 2,000 mile break-in period, they all agree that this version is better than the last one and still retains its rustic charm.

The Wrangler is such a unique animal that it is hard to resist drawing endless comparisons to the previous generation. Nothing else is like it because nothing else has the character, heritage, romance, and mystique of a classic Jeep.

All of the Wrangler's defining elements carry over: seven-slot grille, removable doors, removable top, fold-down windshield, exposed roll cage, tricky access, rear swing gate and hatch, and abundant ground clearance. There's no real hardware revolution here, either, as the new Wrangler retains its body-on-frame construction and front and rear solid axles. The Wrangler is once again available in numerous trims, with a lengthy list of options, from powertrains and equipment to dealer-installed modifications.

We bought the popular four-door configuration, with the uplevel Sahara trim. But to get common comfort features, such as the cold-weather package, tow package, and upgraded infotainment system, we had to pile on the options. Throw in an automatic transmission and blind-spot detection system, and this adventure-ready machine brushes $50,000.

That feels like a lot of money for a vehicle that at its core is bred to get dirty and scratched, and lead a treacherous, adventurous life. Then again, most Wranglers are so-call “mall crawlers,” embodying the lifestyle but living on pavement.

How It Drives
Because it's designed to climb boulders, expectations for the Wrangler's on-road performance are not high. While its handling is improved with quicker steering, it’s still no match for a modern SUV in terms of agility.

This powertrain is significantly improved. The 285-hp, 3.6-liter V6 engine teams smartly with an eight-speed automatic transmission, making for a smooth, refined speed buildup and a prompt throttle response. (A turbocharged 270-hp four-cylinder engine will soon join the ranks, followed by a 3.0-liter diesel in 2019.)

Jeep offers a selectable, full-time four-wheel-drive system—the Wrangler's first—but only in the Sahara trim. The advantage is that it can stay engaged indefinitely, eliminating the need for drivers to make a decision as to when to engage or disengage 4WD.

The ride is stiff, with bumps coming through. Constant short motions make the Jeep jittery even on smooth roads.

On the highway, the Wrangler is clearly out of its element. Because of its boxy shape and lack of a headliner to add isolation, the wind noise can be overwhelming. (Jeep offers headliner panels for the hardtop that may muffle some noise, but they don’t cover the entire roof.)

It's really tough, almost impossible, for occupants to have a natural-volume conversation on the highway. However, the Alpine stereo is powerful, and we did note that hands-free calls worked well.

Inside
Getting in or out is awkward, and that remains a Wrangler tradition. Climbing in, riders must step onto the running board, which positions their body too high, or they must stretch over it. Getting out, there is no way to avoid rubbing pants across the running board—a nuisance in a salty winter or when playing in dirt.

The cabin gets a welcome update in function and appearance. The basic design is familiar, but the digital screens, accent trim, and modern features give the Wrangler a decidedly modern feel. There are nice touches, such as the gear selector with a red trigger release and a classic Jeep on top, the outdoorsy graphics on the displays, and the available auxiliary controls awaiting the installation of aftermarket equipment, such as extra lights.

The controls are arranged on a very flat plane, including the center-positioned window switches. This unusual placement requires some mental reprogramming, and they're a bit of a stretch for the driver to reach. We wish the driver’s window had an auto-up feature, especially on rainy days. We like the push buttons for common functions, like adjusting the heater or turning on the heated steering wheel. (And yes, that is how coddling the Wrangler has become.)

The stalks behind the steering wheel are a bit stubby, making them harder to reach than with most vehicles.

The traditional short, vertical windshield limits the forward view, but visibility through the side windows and rear glass is good.

The seats are wide, accommodating, and spongy. Their initial appeal can wear thin as support fades on long drives. Some testers wished for more bolstering to help hold their bodies in place.

The rear seat has lots of room for adults, though access is more difficult than in most midsized SUVs due to those running boards, a narrow door opening, and tall step-in height.

There is a fair amount of cargo space in the rear with the Unlimited trim. Accessing that area is a two-step process, with the side-hinged gate and the glass hatch. Once open, there is a large cube of open space available.

Safety
The Wrangler does not have many advanced safety features. Higher-trim models offer helpful driver aids, including blind-spot monitoring, rear cross-traffic alert, and a rearview camera with dynamic guidelines. However, forward-collision warning and automatic braking are not offered for 2018, which is surprising on a vehicle that can top $50,000.

Bottom Line

The Jeep Wrangler has an undeniable appeal that can’t be measured. It is the embodiment of a storied history that evokes freedom and adventure.

Yet clearly it isn’t the easiest vehicle to live with. For those seeking a refined SUV, look elsewhere. For those buyers who have owned a Jeep or always dreamed of one, the redesigned Wrangler has fewer trade-offs—and more appeal—than it ever had before, all without compromising its character or off-road credentials.

Formal testing will begin soon, including time on our challenging rock hill course. We'll let you know how it does."
 

drbsp

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Consumer Reports assumes that attributes like "quiet" and "comfortable" make for a better daily driver, but commuting is pretty boring in a quiet/comfortable car. There's something to be said for commuting in an objectively terrible vehicle for keeping things interesting.
I love my Wrangler and while I live in Colorado and drive in the snow often it has never been off road. My wife does not like it as a day to day and would much rather drive her Tahoe but for me I thoroughly enjoy using it as a day to day. It has character and for me the drive is enjoyable albeit unique. The fact that I will never get stuck in the big storms we sometimes get in winter, can always get up to the mountains and in summer can take the top off and enjoy the sun outweighs any potential downside. I have owned Land Robers and Audi’s but the only vehicle I buy these days is a Wrangler
 

That One Guy

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From what I recall - CR pretty much hates any American brand name vehicles- Love the ricers though - clearly biased

My advice? Take those articles with a big grain of salt Use the page(s) for fireplace kindling or puppy training pads- possibly temporary floor mats ;)
Ricers meaning any Japanese car? Hell yeah, they're excellent cars. I was previously cross shopping 2017 and 2018 Accords, since Honda is still cool enough to throw a manual transmission in everything.

I can get wanting American cars to score better, but they have to earn it. Consistently rating them lower points to quality moreso than bias.
 

DaveNH

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Just to bracket in the heights, I'm about 5'11 and don't recall it getting cut off...maybe someone exactly 6'0" can chime in :like:
I haven't sat in a JL yet, but I've been meaning to swing by a dealer to check one out.

I too am 5-11, but have a long torso and short inseams for my height. I've had to put the seat as low as it goes in all of my cars, so I'll be interested to see if I have the cluster issue.
 

rocklobster

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https://www.yahoo.com/amphtml/news/...ocial-sh&soc_trk=tw&__twitter_impression=true

"Redesigning the Jeep Wrangler is a delicate job. Designers have to honor its history and respect its loyal owner base, while addressing significant shortcomings in a marketplace that has seen dramatic evolution since the last version was introduced back in 2006.
:like::like::like::like::like:
The template is clear: Make improvements throughout, but don’t change the silhouette.

Judging by the four-door Wrangler Unlimited Sahara we recently purchased, Jeep seems to have successfully performed this tricky feat. As our testers drive the Wrangler during its 2,000 mile break-in period, they all agree that this version is better than the last one and still retains its rustic charm.

The Wrangler is such a unique animal that it is hard to resist drawing endless comparisons to the previous generation. Nothing else is like it because nothing else has the character, heritage, romance, and mystique of a classic Jeep.

All of the Wrangler's defining elements carry over: seven-slot grille, removable doors, removable top, fold-down windshield, exposed roll cage, tricky access, rear swing gate and hatch, and abundant ground clearance. There's no real hardware revolution here, either, as the new Wrangler retains its body-on-frame construction and front and rear solid axles. The Wrangler is once again available in numerous trims, with a lengthy list of options, from powertrains and equipment to dealer-installed modifications.

We bought the popular four-door configuration, with the uplevel Sahara trim. But to get common comfort features, such as the cold-weather package, tow package, and upgraded infotainment system, we had to pile on the options. Throw in an automatic transmission and blind-spot detection system, and this adventure-ready machine brushes $50,000.

That feels like a lot of money for a vehicle that at its core is bred to get dirty and scratched, and lead a treacherous, adventurous life. Then again, most Wranglers are so-call “mall crawlers,” embodying the lifestyle but living on pavement.

How It Drives
Because it's designed to climb boulders, expectations for the Wrangler's on-road performance are not high. While its handling is improved with quicker steering, it’s still no match for a modern SUV in terms of agility.

This powertrain is significantly improved. The 285-hp, 3.6-liter V6 engine teams smartly with an eight-speed automatic transmission, making for a smooth, refined speed buildup and a prompt throttle response. (A turbocharged 270-hp four-cylinder engine will soon join the ranks, followed by a 3.0-liter diesel in 2019.)

Jeep offers a selectable, full-time four-wheel-drive system—the Wrangler's first—but only in the Sahara trim. The advantage is that it can stay engaged indefinitely, eliminating the need for drivers to make a decision as to when to engage or disengage 4WD.

The ride is stiff, with bumps coming through. Constant short motions make the Jeep jittery even on smooth roads.

On the highway, the Wrangler is clearly out of its element. Because of its boxy shape and lack of a headliner to add isolation, the wind noise can be overwhelming. (Jeep offers headliner panels for the hardtop that may muffle some noise, but they don’t cover the entire roof.)

It's really tough, almost impossible, for occupants to have a natural-volume conversation on the highway. However, the Alpine stereo is powerful, and we did note that hands-free calls worked well.

Inside
Getting in or out is awkward, and that remains a Wrangler tradition. Climbing in, riders must step onto the running board, which positions their body too high, or they must stretch over it. Getting out, there is no way to avoid rubbing pants across the running board—a nuisance in a salty winter or when playing in dirt.

The cabin gets a welcome update in function and appearance. The basic design is familiar, but the digital screens, accent trim, and modern features give the Wrangler a decidedly modern feel. There are nice touches, such as the gear selector with a red trigger release and a classic Jeep on top, the outdoorsy graphics on the displays, and the available auxiliary controls awaiting the installation of aftermarket equipment, such as extra lights.

The controls are arranged on a very flat plane, including the center-positioned window switches. This unusual placement requires some mental reprogramming, and they're a bit of a stretch for the driver to reach. We wish the driver’s window had an auto-up feature, especially on rainy days. We like the push buttons for common functions, like adjusting the heater or turning on the heated steering wheel. (And yes, that is how coddling the Wrangler has become.)

The stalks behind the steering wheel are a bit stubby, making them harder to reach than with most vehicles.

The traditional short, vertical windshield limits the forward view, but visibility through the side windows and rear glass is good.

The seats are wide, accommodating, and spongy. Their initial appeal can wear thin as support fades on long drives. Some testers wished for more bolstering to help hold their bodies in place.

The rear seat has lots of room for adults, though access is more difficult than in most midsized SUVs due to those running boards, a narrow door opening, and tall step-in height.

There is a fair amount of cargo space in the rear with the Unlimited trim. Accessing that area is a two-step process, with the side-hinged gate and the glass hatch. Once open, there is a large cube of open space available.

Safety
The Wrangler does not have many advanced safety features. Higher-trim models offer helpful driver aids, including blind-spot monitoring, rear cross-traffic alert, and a rearview camera with dynamic guidelines. However, forward-collision warning and automatic braking are not offered for 2018, which is surprising on a vehicle that can top $50,000.

Bottom Line

The Jeep Wrangler has an undeniable appeal that can’t be measured. It is the embodiment of a storied history that evokes freedom and adventure.

Yet clearly it isn’t the easiest vehicle to live with. For those seeking a refined SUV, look elsewhere. For those buyers who have owned a Jeep or always dreamed of one, the redesigned Wrangler has fewer trade-offs—and more appeal—than it ever had before, all without compromising its character or off-road credentials.

Formal testing will begin soon, including time on our challenging rock hill course. We'll let you know how it does."
I just read this ,I drive a Telsa X,Cayenne and Range Rover full size, daily and am always so happy to get into my cloth seat 2013 Wrangler unlimited Sahara,these guys are obviously a bit spoilt with what they are driving,and it's all about personal preference,but if they think the stalks are "hard to reach" and they need to "reprogram" themselves because the window controls are in the stack ,I think they have gone a bit soft!... I did an 8000km roadtrip 2 years ago from NYC to LA(with a few detours) and I never felt uncomfortable,and my back is not in perfect condition(I am 52) if they think they need to "reprogram" themselves they will blow a fuse when they try to adapt to the Tesla...anyway,I know we have a rose tinted view of the Wrangler and we all see the JL as a huge leap in comfort and equipment (and price)over the JK,they are outside our bubble lol... looking forward to the arrival of my Sting Gray Rubicon :like:
 

manuka

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Consumers Reports = "A Guide to a Boring Life"
 

Tfom

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After reading this review, I've decided that CR is right. I'm going to go out and get their top pick crossover vehicle. I now understand that I need a whisper quiet interior and smooth on road handling so that I can spend the next ten years of my life thinking about how I hate myself.
 

Newbiejeeperjl

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Sad to say I see more hardtop Wrangler, especially unlimited that it is clear the full top has never been taken off. :( When it is sunny in the 90's with no rain in the forecast and your hardtop is still on.... that makes me a sad panda.
In my part of the world, I haven’t seen One Jeep with the top down this spring, Isn’t that have the reason for getting one!? When your not off road, it’s still fun going to Walmart with the doors and top off!
 

Newbiejeeperjl

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Obviously everyone’s shared their opinions already but for me I’m 6’5” 22 year old and this will be my 3rd Vehicle. I started out with a 1.6L Kia Soul which was a fun small city car but I got bored and wanted something more sporty. So I was able to transition into a V6 Mustang and have loved it as well. But now that I actually need functionality out of a vehicle but don’t want to give up the fun factor so I started looking into Jeeps. The new JL is basically exactly what I want out of my daily driver (besides mpg). Daily driving a Mustang right now is fun except for the fact that there’s no cargo space and it sits so low that getting in and out gets a little annoying. For me hopping into a JL is fairly natural since I just have to slightly step up into it. At one point I also considered getting a motorcycle for the open air feeling but the Wrangler also checks that off my list. I’ll be a happy man come this summer (at least until it gets over 105).
I’m surprised you fit into the jlu? At 5’10, with the seat pushed all the way back, it fits like a glove. I can’t imagine being over 6ft...
 

Bkenyon53

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I commute 15 minutes into Boulder and back to my quite suburb. Most of the road traveled is winding backroads. Compliment that with it being the weekend warrior and I have to say, best. daily. driver. ever.
The lease on my Sierra was up so I got my wife an Acadia (her choice).
She was driving a '16 JKU Sahara.

Who has two thumbs and gets to drive the Sahara until his Rubicon gets delivered? This guy.
 
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