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multicam

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It is strange to me how worked up people get about the ESS. I don't even notice it and took me maybe a day to subconsciously take my foot off the brake for a half second before the light turns green. If I am going to go on a trail or a lot of stop and go maybe I turn it off.

MPG is not the point of it so using MPG to "prove" the worth of it is somewhat pointless.
Buddy, this was just a fuel consumption analysis for my own edification. Y’all can do whatever you want with this data or nothing at all, doesn’t matter to me. Everyone’s use case is going to be so different anyway as to render all this purely for informational / entertainment purposes:like:

and like you said, no one’s worked up over this anyway, it’s all just fun conversation / debate!:rock:
 

Sean L

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Everyone’s use case is going to be so different anyway as to render all this purely for informational / entertainment purposes:like:
This point right here hits the nail on the head!

Jeeper A: lives way out in the sticks and never sees a stop light. ESS Does nothing

Jeeper B: lives in a moderately sized city/suburb. ESS is used as needed and provides a benefit.

Jeeper C: Lives in Manhattan. ESS Pisses him off because it activates every 3 seconds. ESS is ripped out and is unable to do anything. Jeeper C would be better off taking the subway to work, but drives anyway.

None of the above Jeepers realize that other people will have different driving conditions, their opinion of ESS is the only valid train of thought, and resort to internet flamewars...
 

Cazadores

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Buddy, this was just a fuel consumption analysis for my own edification. Y’all can do whatever you want with this data or nothing at all, doesn’t matter to me. Everyone’s use case is going to be so different anyway as to render all this purely for informational / entertainment purposes:like:
Although in modern engines consumption is generally regarded as directly related to emissions, where higher fuel economy equates to lower emissions.

I'm not sure what other metric could be used to measure the effectiveness of ESS, or to "prove" its worth, and short of attaching an emissions analyzer to your JLR and driving around with it on for a year, think your efforts are pretty interesting and fun discussion.

What would be great, is a JLR without the added ESS components, driven by the same driver over a period of time in the same conditions, compared to one with the added weight and wear of the ESS equipped JLR.

Likely negligible, but I think interesting if it could be done.

Anyway. Thanks for a great discussion. Glad we are able to enjoy our toys as we see fit, just wish ESS was optional.
 

jespey

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We’ve now had it at the dealer three times for the ESS not working. We never had a warning light, but we noticed it wasn’t working even if we had driven 30 miles on the interstate with the windows down, no a/c, just the radio on. In other words, in situations where it should work. All three times, the dealer first tried to say that it is condition based (like hvac requirements, engine temperature, etc.), but once we had just driven on I-95 240 miles , and the others at least 30 miles with no air conditioning, so the batteries had plenty of time to charge. The EVIC always says “auto start stop not ready battery charging”, and in fact it does not work. First time they replaced drivers seat sensor, and charged the battery. Worked for maybe a month, then stopped. Second time, they replaced the IBS, which I think is the intelligent battery sensor, and charged the batteries. Worked for a while, then stopped.

Third time, they couldn’t find anything, and said there were no codes or anything showing on the computer, the batteries “passed” their test, but needed charging. Said they needed more time, but we are leaving town for a few days so we‘ll have to take it back.

This is incredibly frustrating. I can’t believe they haven’t tried replacing the batteries. Jeep Cares, if you are listening can you help?
 

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I may have missed it somewhere else in this thread, but have you tried actually reading the ESS tab in the dash display? It will usually tell you in the moment the reason for not activating. (Battery charging, outside temperature too high, wheel turned, etc.) It’s frustratingly finicky.
 

jespey

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I may have missed it somewhere else in this thread, but have you tried actually reading the ESS tab in the dash display? It will usually tell you in the moment the reason for not activating. (Battery charging, outside temperature too high, wheel turned, etc.) It’s frustratingly finicky.
Yeah. It always reads battery charging. Even when I drove it home from the dealer this afternoon. The battery charge read 13.6 in that tab of the dash display.
 

DadJokes

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I understand the principle of the matter but time is one thing you can’t really get back. I’d replace the ESS battery with the best battery available, maybe both, and try to be done with it. It sounds like the battery will not hold a charge and is definitely depleted.
 

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Fellow Jeep enthusiasts, over the first two years of owning my Jeep I have recorded every tank of gas put into it. The data I have recorded includes number of gallons pumped, miles driven per trip odometer "A", average fuel economy per trip odometer "A", date, and observed fuel economy per total miles actually driven divided by actual gallons put into the jeep (in other words, real hand-calculated MPG). Armed with this data I present the following for the betterment of the community.

First, the BLUF: Over 122 tanks of gas (really, 110 as I will explain below) I averaged 17.8 mpg on the first half while disabling ESS and 18.0 mpg on the second half while leaving ESS enabled as per the jeep's default. According to my math -which could be complete garbage- I saved about 10 gallons of fuel on the second half of this experiment. On average the computer was 0.4 mpg too optimistic compared to the observed, hand-calculated MPG. Now, on to some of the details.

Subject matter
2019 Jeep Wrangler Rubicon
  • Manual Transmission
  • Steel Bumper Group
  • LED Headlights
  • Painted fender flares
  • No other factory options and no aftermarket mods - the jeep remained completely stock through the entire test period
theJL.jpg


Methodology
The testing period began on 22 April 2019 when I took delivery of the jeep and ended on 14 May 2021 when I put the 122nd tank of gas in it, just over two years later. I implemented a number of control measures to decrease variables in the conduct of data collection:
  • Every tank was filled with Regular Unleaded 87 octane fuel
  • My commute typically included 46 miles of interstate highway driving and 14 miles of country roads / city street / mixed roads
  • Pure highway tanks greatly exceeded the 17.9 mpg average, but I don't take many road trips. Even though my daily commute had a good amount of highway miles there was still a lot of short range, slow driving mixed in
  • I filled every tank up until the first "click" then attempted to top it off exactly one time. This extra top-off had to have real fuel flow, not just the backpressure-restricted weak flow immediately following the first "click"
  • The last few drops of fuel would be shaken out of the fuel filler nozzle
  • Each receipt was collected from the pump and the following written on each receipt:
    • Tank X (X = 1, 2, 3, 4, or whatever number tank it was)
    • Y miles (Y = miles driven on that tank from trip odometer "A")
    • Z mpg (c) (Z = mpg as reported by trip odometer "A")(The "c" in parenthesis means computer)
  • If, for some reason, I was unable to collect a receipt from the pump or the attendant inside (i.e. if I was too lazy to go inside) I would write all the above data on the previous tank's receipt plus date, gas station location, gallons of fuel pumped, and USD spent on fuel
  • Trip odometer "A" was reset before turning the Jeep on to ensure that all fuel burned post-filling counted against the next tank
  • All data was entered into an excel spreadsheet which used an equation to calculate MPG (observed) and the delta between MPG (c) and MPG (o)
  • Every effort was made to avoid "short" tanks. I would usually fill up when the indicator said 25-40 miles of range remaining but didn't worry too much about it
  • The entire testing period took place in Texas. The length of the test ensured that data was collected for both ESS and non-ESS in all weather and driving conditions
  • On tanks 1-61, ESS was disabled religiously. Part of my turning-on-the-jeep ritual was hitting the ESS button. Breaking this habit proved very difficult for the first few tanks of the 62-122 set of tanks
  • On tanks 62-122, I did my best to allow ESS to work as intended to gain the most benefit from it
  • Of the 122 tanks collected, I discarded the top 3 and bottom 3 observed MPG tanks for both ESS and non-ESS categories, resulting in 110 total tanks analyzed
Below is a sample of the data from my excel spreadsheet:
jeepmpg.JPG


Conclusions
  • Over the course of 30,435.5 miles, the difference between 17.8 mpg and 18.0 mpg is 18.99 gallons, or $54.12 with the current gas prices near me. Not worth it. Going forward I'll go back to disabling ESS like I did on tanks 1 through 61
  • ESS really isn't that annoying. The worst part about it is the climate control losing its effectiveness in the heat or cold. But again, not worth it to me, especially considering it may cause unnecessary wear on the starter
  • Don't trust the computer to tell you accurate mileage. Most of the time it was overly optimistic, and as stated in the BLUF, it was off by 0.4 mpg on average
  • 2-door Rubicon doesn't get good gas mileage
  • I reserve the right to edit the shit out of this post if I made egregious errors ;)
  • YMMV
What size motor????
 

DanW

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My experience wasn't nearly as scientific as OP's. But my drive, I am certain, has many more stoplights on a 45-55mph US Highway, 38 miles round trip to and from work. Typically, I get 1mpg improvement.

If I didn't think it was hard on the batteries and engine, I would use it. But even for 1 mpg, which is about a 7% or so improvement, it is not worth it on a vehicle I plan to keep a long, long time. A Pentastar designer told me he'd never use it. He said they put a coating on the wear parts to compensate for the extra wear it causes, but that the jury is out on it and he doesn't trust it. He did say that the starter was designed to be robust enough to handle the many additional cycles, though. So I figure the starter might outlast me if I don't use ESS.

One other issue is that with the manual, if you are too quick at a stoplight with your clutching, it can cause it to fumble and fail to start. That sucks. It happened to me at least 3 times in the short amount of time I used ESS. So I've got the Tazer JL so I don't have to remember to press the button.
 

DanW

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I understand the principle of the matter but time is one thing you can’t really get back. I’d replace the ESS battery with the best battery available, maybe both, and try to be done with it. It sounds like the battery will not hold a charge and is definitely depleted.
I agree. I have seen that the OEM batteries tend to fail around 3 years, so in March I replaced both. I went with an Odyssey pure lead AGM on the main and an AGM auxillary battery (I can't remember the brand, from Advance Auto), which was the best on the market at the time. Without running the ESS, they should go a long time. I'd bet they'd perform better with it, too. That Odyssey is a beast. They are made by Northstar, which I have in my JK.

I just can't help but think my OEM batteries would have gone longer without the ESS, but I wasn't going to chance it as we were going to EJS in Moab. Then my cousin's 2018 JK battery failed. So I think the OEM's go about 3 years and done, no matter what. But I think a pure lead AGM would perform better regardless of ESS or not, and will last much longer. They certainly handle winching much better.
 

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