Big or Tall JL seat bracket needed

LDJD79

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Will do thanks all!
If you end up grinding the seat adjustment stop please take a picture and post it. I may end up just doing that to the passenger side seat. I looked at it and I don’t think modifying the rail brackets will work on the passenger side because of clearance issues underneath.





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Kcd

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If you end up grinding the seat adjustment stop please take a picture and post it. I may end up just doing that to the passenger side seat. I looked at it and I don’t think modifying the rail brackets will work on the passenger side because of clearance issues underneath.
Will do. I am removing the rear seat brackets this weekend and if more clearance is needed the height stop is getting whacked.
 

Whaler27

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Will do. I am removing the rear seat brackets this weekend and if more clearance is needed the height stop is getting whacked.
Depending on the amount of height reduction you need, you may find that the height-stop-grinding is the easiest, least noticeable, solution.
 

Kcd

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Depending on the amount of height reduction you need, you may find that the height-stop-grinding is the easiest, least noticeable, solution.
Sounds like a good idea. I assume with increased tilt my knee may not be banging up against the t-case shift knob as much. I should just get a bigger vehicle but nothing beats my 2 door Rubi.
 

MJHuber

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Hi all, I am in the process of lowering both of my front seats and will post my full process when complete. I removed my seats and cut off all four rear brackets a few weeks ago, I then cut the brackets down and I'm having a plate welded to the modified brackets. I will then paint the new brackets to match and bolt them back on the rails with grade 8 bolts. I am also raising the front rail connection points about an inch, this will provide for the rails near the console to clear the plastic electrical raceways. Currently I have a prototype installed which is working really well and giving me an additional 2" of head clearance and a much better seat angle. It is a game changer and makes the seats very comfortable.

20201230_095856.jpg


20201230_095937.jpg
 

the_webers_inc

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LDJD79

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Sounds like a good idea. I assume with increased tilt my knee may not be banging up against the t-case shift knob as much. I should just get a bigger vehicle but nothing beats my 2 door Rubi.
Well I just noticed the passenger seat doesn’t have height adjustment so you can’t grind the stop on passenger side to lower that seat. There is an extra wiring harness under the left rail on passenger side too that will make it harder to lower the bracket way. It could probably be moved but I am not going to mess with lowering the passenger side I don’t think.
 

MJHuber

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Hi All - I just finished lowering both front seats and wanted to share. Sorry in advance for this being so lengthy, I have lived and breathed this over the last few weeks and wanted to share as many details (and mistakes :facepalm:) as I could in the hope that it will make someone’s life a little easier.

I received quite a bit of inspiration from this thread, so thanks for all of the prior information, I don’t think I would have tackled this without everyone’s input.

I have a 2021 JLUR that had 200 miles on it when I started this project, I bought it knowing that I would need to do something with the seats, and I am so glad I did. It is a game changer. If you are tall and having issues with not getting comfortable, hitting your head on the sound bar, legs falling asleep, you can’t see the top of the instrument cluster, and you feel like you’re always sliding forward into the dash because the uncomfortable angle on the seats, I would highly recommend lowering the rear brackets and raising the front brackets using either this method or the other methods posted on this thread. I am 6’-5” with fairly normal (approaching circus-freak 🤡) proportions, sitting in either the driver or passenger seats prior to lowering them was doable but it was very uncomfortable, I would hit my head on the sound bar and hated the lack of an angle on the seats, those were my biggest complaints. I just took my Jeep for a test drive and the change really is incredible.

I am using the term “bracket” to mean the piece that connects the seat rails to the body of the Jeep:
20201214_134902[1].jpg


I wanted to play around with sample parts before I started cutting my Jeep apart so bought a Front Seat Cushion Frame (part 68276600ae) through OEMPartsSource.com for $75.91. This also helped to make a mock-up of the brackets before I cut the brackets off of my seats. This is basically the entire lower portion of the seat frame, including the rails, brackets, seat structure, etc. for the passenger side only. The driver’s side was over $300 (I think because it includes the ability to manually raise and lower the seat?). As far as I can tell both the driver and passenger sides are exact mirrors of each other dimensionally.

Using the sample Seat Cushion Frame I then built a jig out of scrap lumber for both rails that closely matched the contours in the body of the Jeep where the brackets were bolted to, this in my mind was a key step because I would have been lost in a lot of the steps without it after I cut my sample Seat Cushion Frame apart. It also allowed me to measure the before and after a little easier.

I then removed both rails from my sample Seat Cushion Frame, and unfortunately the only way to do this was to destroy the rail and frame interface, so once you do it there’s really no way of putting it back together. The rail and frame connection has two different sizes of ball bearings and plastic bearing races the bearings slide on. There are plastic clips on the front that I removed by unscrewing the small Torx screw and then I used a hammer to tap the rail off of the frame with bearings and plastic pieces going everywhere. This I believe will be the issue for an aftermarket vendor wanting to create a mass produced lowered seat bracket as it’s all one assembly and you can’t remove the rails without destroying it. Hopefully a vendor will eventually offer aftermarket seats that are more comfortable and include brackets that are already lower.

I then used a DeWalt reciprocating saw with a metal cutting blade with carbide teeth to remove the Seat Cushion Frame brackets from the rails so I could practice making this cut on the sample before cutting into my actual seats. If I did it over again I would use an angle grinder with a thin metal cut off wheel for this step. The recip saw ends up tearing things up quite a bit and it was pretty tough to control. The welds that attach the stock brackets to the bottom of the rails look like they are laser welded and they are not very deep, so I think a thin cutoff wheel would work the best.

20201219_090209[1].jpg


So now I was ready to start modifying my actual seats. :crying:

Under Seat Modifications:
I removed the four T50 Torx bolts from each of the front seats and removed the seats from the Jeep. The nuts that the bolts screw into are captive nuts held within the Jeep body and they have some play to them which will make it easier to reassemble everything. You may want to tape socks over the brackets as they will scuff up the plastic trim pretty easily, especially when you are pulling the seats out of the Jeep. The first modification I made under the seats was removing the ground studs and relocating the ground wires to other locations under the seat and the console. I started to use a reciprocating saw to remove these but ended up just bending them off and taping the small hole with Gorilla tape. These studs would most likely interfere with the lowered rails. The front rail bracket to body threaded connection near the console actually leans forward slightly and so the other modification I made was to tap the body down with a hammer on the rear side of the threaded connection in order to make that threaded connection more plumb and vertical. This will help as this slight forward angle becomes near vertical after the rear bracket is lowered. There will also be plastic electrical raceways that come out from under the console and under both the driver and passenger seats. I ended up also raising my front seat bracket connections in order to clear these plastic raceways, more on that later on in this post.

I then cut all four rear brackets (two for passenger and two for drivers) off of the rails on both seats using the recip saw. I remember puckering a little and thinking “there’s no turning back now” right before I started cutting into my brand new seats! :fingerscrossed:

I had two ideas for how I was going to fabricate new lowered brackets and I will explain both of them just in case you want to tackle either one.

Plan A:
My Plan A was to fabricate new rear brackets using 2” x 3/8” steel flat bar that I picked up at Home Depot. I cut the steel flat bar using the same DeWalt reciprocating saw using a piece of the plate as a guide to make sure the cuts were fairly straight. I kerf cut about halfway through where I wanted to bend the plate and bent it at approximately 11 degrees in a vise. I was planning to have my welder weld the kerf cut and then weld the two plates together but since I ended up using the other option I didn’t end up welding them and this is where I stopped. The good thing about this method if you end up using it is that you would still have the stock brackets that you could bolt back onto the rails if you ever wanted to get it back to stock. With the next method that I ended up going with I had to modify the stock brackets so I can’t return to stock if I wanted to in the future.
20201226_181213[1].jpg

20201219_215016[1].jpg


Plan B:
I really wanted to make everything look as stock as possible, so my second plan was to take the stock rear seat brackets that I had cut off, and cut those down to the same 11 degree angle, weld a section of 2” x 3/8” steel flat bar to them, and bolt them back on to the rails. My concern with this method was if my welder would be able to weld the 3/8” plate and the cut stock brackets together, but after I showed him both parts he was confident he could handle it so I ended up going with Plan B.

I started cutting the stock brackets down. I scribed the approximate cut location using the jig I had made, then clamped the brackets to my workbench and cut the brackets using the same saw with the carbide blade. I made sure I was conservative in my cut location to give me plenty of room to remove more material as I knew I could only remove and not add material back. I then used my bench grinder to shape them and remove material until all four were the same, the surface to be welded was flat and the angle was correct. This was a pretty tedious process but strangely enjoyable 😊.

20201230_095937[1].jpg

20201230_095856[1].jpg

I then cut the four 2” x 3/8” plates and marked where I want them to be welded and went to see my welder.

Here are some pics of the brackets after he welded them, he really did an incredible job, the welds are just beautiful. In case anyone wants to reach out to him he is Anthony Varela with Hot Shot Fabrication in Parker, Colorado. His phone number is 860-817-2619 and email is [email protected]. He told me he could fabricate brackets without using the stock bracket that would look close to stock if anyone is interested. You’d still have to cut your brackets off and bolt the new ones back on but this would save you from having to perform the most challenging steps.


20210102_145607[1].jpg

20210102_150145[1].jpg

I then needed to drill the holes in the new rear brackets, but before I did I wanted to also raise the front connections to get a little more angle in the seat for comfort and also to make sure I cleared the plastic electrical raceways that comes out from under the console. You will need to add the spacers before you determine your hole locations in your rear backets as the front bracket connection locations and height will affect the rear hole locations. I made the spacers for the front connections using 3/8” washers that I electrical taped together to create about a 1” spacer for both driver and passenger seat connections closest to the console. I used a M10-1.50 x 60 black oxide socket head cap screws that I purchased from Ace Hardware to attach the brackets and the new spacers.

The front outside connections are more complicated to raise because the stock brackets sit at a 45 degree angle so you can’t really use washers as spacers to raise the height. I ended up using 1 ½” x ¼” flat bar and JB Weld to fabricate a few sample spacers similar to the spacers that Desert Does It sells. I may end up buying the spacers from them but for now mine seem to be working ok.

20201224_123830[1].jpg



After I installed the front spacers I then installed the new rear brackets in as close to the final locations as I could, then marked the hole locations on the plates and drilled them using a drill press. I used 3/8”-16 fasteners, there are two existing holes on the stock rails that I connected to, the hole toward the rear is big enough, but I had to drill out slightly the hole toward the front to accept the 3/8” bolt. It’s easier to drill these additional holes with the seats out of the Jeep, so make sure you drill them right after you cut off the brackets so you don’t have to pull the seats out multiple times. You will also want to touch up the paint on the stock rails at this time as they will likely get scuffed up when you cut the brackets off. See below for the paint I used.

I then drilled my bolt hole locations in the new brackets, cleaned up the them up just a little, sanded them down, etch primed and painted them. If I had to do it over again I would have had them powder coated to match but I think they look pretty close to the OEM paint. The finish scuffed a little when I installed them so that would be the benefit of powder coating them.

20210103_145852[1].jpg

20210106_171714[1].jpg
20210106_171622[1].jpg

I bolted them to the rails using grade 8 black oxide bolts I bought from Ace Hardware. This was after I tried painting yellow grade 8 bolts and I ended up having most of the paint chip off on my rear carpet after I tried installing them with a socket, it was a complete mess. Get the black oxide ones if you can. BTW it has been a few years since I’ve been in an Ace Hardware store, they have an amazing (almost overwhelming 😊) supply of fasteners.

I ended up getting about 1 ¾” of lowering the rear brackets and now I have a total of 2 ¾” of more angle in the seat which is so much more comfortable.

20210108_171928[1].jpg


Hope this helps, good luck if anyone tries to tackle it, I have to say it was a lot of work but the end product is so worth it!

By the way, I love my new Jeep, it is the most fun to drive vehicle I have ever owned and I smile like a kid at Christmas every time I get behind the wheel!

20201214_134902[1].jpg


Screenshot_20201220-193226_Chrome[1].jpg


20201219_090209[1].jpg


20201219_215016[1].jpg


20201226_181213[1].jpg


20201230_095937[1].jpg


20201230_095856[1].jpg


20210102_145607[1].jpg


20210102_150145[1].jpg


20201224_123830[1].jpg


20210103_145852[1].jpg


20210106_171714[1].jpg


20210108_171928[1].jpg


20210106_171622[1].jpg
 

jlrusoin

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Hi All - I just finished lowering both front seats and wanted to share. Sorry in advance for this being so lengthy, I have lived and breathed this over the last few weeks and wanted to share as many details (and mistakes :facepalm:) as I could in the hope that it will make someone’s life a little easier.

I received quite a bit of inspiration from this thread, so thanks for all of the prior information, I don’t think I would have tackled this without everyone’s input.

I have a 2021 JLUR that had 200 miles on it when I started this project, I bought it knowing that I would need to do something with the seats, and I am so glad I did. It is a game changer. If you are tall and having issues with not getting comfortable, hitting your head on the sound bar, legs falling asleep, you can’t see the top of the instrument cluster, and you feel like you’re always sliding forward into the dash because the uncomfortable angle on the seats, I would highly recommend lowering the rear brackets and raising the front brackets using either this method or the other methods posted on this thread. I am 6’-5” with fairly normal (approaching circus-freak 🤡) proportions, sitting in either the driver or passenger seats prior to lowering them was doable but it was very uncomfortable, I would hit my head on the sound bar and hated the lack of an angle on the seats, those were my biggest complaints. I just took my Jeep for a test drive and the change really is incredible.

I am using the term “bracket” to mean the piece that connects the seat rails to the body of the Jeep:
20201214_134902[1].jpg


I wanted to play around with sample parts before I started cutting my Jeep apart so bought a Front Seat Cushion Frame (part 68276600ae) through OEMPartsSource.com for $75.91. This also helped to make a mock-up of the brackets before I cut the brackets off of my seats. This is basically the entire lower portion of the seat frame, including the rails, brackets, seat structure, etc. for the passenger side only. The driver’s side was over $300 (I think because it includes the ability to manually raise and lower the seat?). As far as I can tell both the driver and passenger sides are exact mirrors of each other dimensionally.

Using the sample Seat Cushion Frame I then built a jig out of scrap lumber for both rails that closely matched the contours in the body of the Jeep where the brackets were bolted to, this in my mind was a key step because I would have been lost in a lot of the steps without it after I cut my sample Seat Cushion Frame apart. It also allowed me to measure the before and after a little easier.

I then removed both rails from my sample Seat Cushion Frame, and unfortunately the only way to do this was to destroy the rail and frame interface, so once you do it there’s really no way of putting it back together. The rail and frame connection has two different sizes of ball bearings and plastic bearing races the bearings slide on. There are plastic clips on the front that I removed by unscrewing the small Torx screw and then I used a hammer to tap the rail off of the frame with bearings and plastic pieces going everywhere. This I believe will be the issue for an aftermarket vendor wanting to create a mass produced lowered seat bracket as it’s all one assembly and you can’t remove the rails without destroying it. Hopefully a vendor will eventually offer aftermarket seats that are more comfortable and include brackets that are already lower.

I then used a DeWalt reciprocating saw with a metal cutting blade with carbide teeth to remove the Seat Cushion Frame brackets from the rails so I could practice making this cut on the sample before cutting into my actual seats. If I did it over again I would use an angle grinder with a thin metal cut off wheel for this step. The recip saw ends up tearing things up quite a bit and it was pretty tough to control. The welds that attach the stock brackets to the bottom of the rails look like they are laser welded and they are not very deep, so I think a thin cutoff wheel would work the best.

20201219_090209[1].jpg


So now I was ready to start modifying my actual seats. :crying:

Under Seat Modifications:
I removed the four T50 Torx bolts from each of the front seats and removed the seats from the Jeep. The nuts that the bolts screw into are captive nuts held within the Jeep body and they have some play to them which will make it easier to reassemble everything. You may want to tape socks over the brackets as they will scuff up the plastic trim pretty easily, especially when you are pulling the seats out of the Jeep. The first modification I made under the seats was removing the ground studs and relocating the ground wires to other locations under the seat and the console. I started to use a reciprocating saw to remove these but ended up just bending them off and taping the small hole with Gorilla tape. These studs would most likely interfere with the lowered rails. The front rail bracket to body threaded connection near the console actually leans forward slightly and so the other modification I made was to tap the body down with a hammer on the rear side of the threaded connection in order to make that threaded connection more plumb and vertical. This will help as this slight forward angle becomes near vertical after the rear bracket is lowered. There will also be plastic electrical raceways that come out from under the console and under both the driver and passenger seats. I ended up also raising my front seat bracket connections in order to clear these plastic raceways, more on that later on in this post.

I then cut all four rear brackets (two for passenger and two for drivers) off of the rails on both seats using the recip saw. I remember puckering a little and thinking “there’s no turning back now” right before I started cutting into my brand new seats! :fingerscrossed:

I had two ideas for how I was going to fabricate new lowered brackets and I will explain both of them just in case you want to tackle either one.

Plan A:
My Plan A was to fabricate new rear brackets using 2” x 3/8” steel flat bar that I picked up at Home Depot. I cut the steel flat bar using the same DeWalt reciprocating saw using a piece of the plate as a guide to make sure the cuts were fairly straight. I kerf cut about halfway through where I wanted to bend the plate and bent it at approximately 11 degrees in a vise. I was planning to have my welder weld the kerf cut and then weld the two plates together but since I ended up using the other option I didn’t end up welding them and this is where I stopped. The good thing about this method if you end up using it is that you would still have the stock brackets that you could bolt back onto the rails if you ever wanted to get it back to stock. With the next method that I ended up going with I had to modify the stock brackets so I can’t return to stock if I wanted to in the future.
20201226_181213[1].jpg

20201219_215016[1].jpg


Plan B:
I really wanted to make everything look as stock as possible, so my second plan was to take the stock rear seat brackets that I had cut off, and cut those down to the same 11 degree angle, weld a section of 2” x 3/8” steel flat bar to them, and bolt them back on to the rails. My concern with this method was if my welder would be able to weld the 3/8” plate and the cut stock brackets together, but after I showed him both parts he was confident he could handle it so I ended up going with Plan B.

I started cutting the stock brackets down. I scribed the approximate cut location using the jig I had made, then clamped the brackets to my workbench and cut the brackets using the same saw with the carbide blade. I made sure I was conservative in my cut location to give me plenty of room to remove more material as I knew I could only remove and not add material back. I then used my bench grinder to shape them and remove material until all four were the same, the surface to be welded was flat and the angle was correct. This was a pretty tedious process but strangely enjoyable 😊.

20201230_095937[1].jpg

20201230_095856[1].jpg

I then cut the four 2” x 3/8” plates and marked where I want them to be welded and went to see my welder.

Here are some pics of the brackets after he welded them, he really did an incredible job, the welds are just beautiful. In case anyone wants to reach out to him he is Anthony Varela with Hot Shot Fabrication in Parker, Colorado. His phone number is 860-817-2619 and email is [email protected]. He told me he could fabricate brackets without using the stock bracket that would look close to stock if anyone is interested. You’d still have to cut your brackets off and bolt the new ones back on but this would save you from having to perform the most challenging steps.


20210102_145607[1].jpg

20210102_150145[1].jpg

I then needed to drill the holes in the new rear brackets, but before I did I wanted to also raise the front connections to get a little more angle in the seat for comfort and also to make sure I cleared the plastic electrical raceways that comes out from under the console. You will need to add the spacers before you determine your hole locations in your rear backets as the front bracket connection locations and height will affect the rear hole locations. I made the spacers for the front connections using 3/8” washers that I electrical taped together to create about a 1” spacer for both driver and passenger seat connections closest to the console. I used a M10-1.50 x 60 black oxide socket head cap screws that I purchased from Ace Hardware to attach the brackets and the new spacers.

The front outside connections are more complicated to raise because the stock brackets sit at a 45 degree angle so you can’t really use washers as spacers to raise the height. I ended up using 1 ½” x ¼” flat bar and JB Weld to fabricate a few sample spacers similar to the spacers that Desert Does It sells. I may end up buying the spacers from them but for now mine seem to be working ok.

20201224_123830[1].jpg



After I installed the front spacers I then installed the new rear brackets in as close to the final locations as I could, then marked the hole locations on the plates and drilled them using a drill press. I used 3/8”-16 fasteners, there are two existing holes on the stock rails that I connected to, the hole toward the rear is big enough, but I had to drill out slightly the hole toward the front to accept the 3/8” bolt. It’s easier to drill these additional holes with the seats out of the Jeep, so make sure you drill them right after you cut off the brackets so you don’t have to pull the seats out multiple times. You will also want to touch up the paint on the stock rails at this time as they will likely get scuffed up when you cut the brackets off. See below for the paint I used.

I then drilled my bolt hole locations in the new brackets, cleaned up the them up just a little, sanded them down, etch primed and painted them. If I had to do it over again I would have had them powder coated to match but I think they look pretty close to the OEM paint. The finish scuffed a little when I installed them so that would be the benefit of powder coating them.

20210103_145852[1].jpg

20210106_171714[1].jpg
20210106_171622[1].jpg

I bolted them to the rails using grade 8 black oxide bolts I bought from Ace Hardware. This was after I tried painting yellow grade 8 bolts and I ended up having most of the paint chip off on my rear carpet after I tried installing them with a socket, it was a complete mess. Get the black oxide ones if you can. BTW it has been a few years since I’ve been in an Ace Hardware store, they have an amazing (almost overwhelming 😊) supply of fasteners.

I ended up getting about 1 ¾” of lowering the rear brackets and now I have a total of 2 ¾” of more angle in the seat which is so much more comfortable.

20210108_171928[1].jpg


Hope this helps, good luck if anyone tries to tackle it, I have to say it was a lot of work but the end product is so worth it!

By the way, I love my new Jeep, it is the most fun to drive vehicle I have ever owned and I smile like a kid at Christmas every time I get behind the wheel!

20201214_134902[1].jpg


Screenshot_20201220-193226_Chrome[1].jpg


20201219_090209[1].jpg


20201219_215016[1].jpg


20201226_181213[1].jpg


20201230_095937[1].jpg


20201230_095856[1].jpg


20210102_145607[1].jpg


20210102_150145[1].jpg


20201224_123830[1].jpg


20210103_145852[1].jpg


20210106_171714[1].jpg


20210108_171928[1].jpg


20210106_171622[1].jpg
Awesome work and write up! Glad someone made my redneck solution look and work great. Tall people rock and have united to support our kind 😄
 

crdouglass3

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I have been following this thread with the same complaint as others, tired of feeling like I am sitting on top of the Jeep. It's super cool to see all of the different approaches. @jlrusoin & @LDJD79 & @MJHuber You guys are awesome for taking the time to share the details of your solutions.

I completed my lowering mod last night using the LDJD79 approach but with 1.5" square aluminum bar stock. I don't have a machine shop so my aluminum adapters are a bit janky. I'll probably use these to design proper adapters and have them machined & anodized. For now, they'll work. The lowered seat is a major improvement!

2021-01-09 21.45.31.jpg
2021-01-09 21.45.39.jpg
2021-01-10 11.32.19.jpg
2021-01-10 11.32.27.jpg
 

MJHuber

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I have been following this thread with the same complaint as others, tired of feeling like I am sitting on top of the Jeep. It's super cool to see all of the different approaches. @jlrusoin & @LDJD79 & @MJHuber You guys are awesome for taking the time to share the details of your solutions.

I completed my lowering mod last night using the LDJD79 approach but with 1.5" square aluminum bar stock. I don't have a machine shop so my aluminum adapters are a bit janky. I'll probably use these to design proper adapters and have them machined & anodized. For now, they'll work. The lowered seat is a major improvement!

2021-01-09 21.45.31.jpg
2021-01-09 21.45.39.jpg
2021-01-10 11.32.19.jpg
2021-01-10 11.32.27.jpg
They look really great, I love how you did it. It is a complete game changer isn't it?
 

Sierra

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1
Can you sell a pair of this? :rock:😁

I have been following this thread with the same complaint as others, tired of feeling like I am sitting on top of the Jeep. It's super cool to see all of the different approaches. @jlrusoin & @LDJD79 & @MJHuber You guys are awesome for taking the time to share the details of your solutions.

I completed my lowering mod last night using the LDJD79 approach but with 1.5" square aluminum bar stock. I don't have a machine shop so my aluminum adapters are a bit janky. I'll probably use these to design proper adapters and have them machined & anodized. For now, they'll work. The lowered seat is a major improvement!

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