Banks Power - Ram Air Intake

moodywizard

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@AnnDee4444 My cc is burning a hole in my pocket. The reason it is still in my pocket is because I don't see any dyno #'s for HP gain/loss.
Any gains are going to be minimal at best, don’t fool yourself haha now if you had it tuned let’s say with the pulsar ecu swap you might see some good numbers. In the end I’ll probably add boost or V8,but got other priorities before I get there.
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DanW

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I ordered the dry filter as in the past Ive has issues with the oil contaminating the MAF sensors etc..

you can order prefilter socks from AFE or amsoil I believe, just need to measure the size of the filter. I am curious about the water fording as well, I did not see a picture of the fresh air opening so not sure how far down the fresh air intake portion is. Will see... I dont remember seeing any "intake tube" from the grille to the intake. I just installed AAL inner fenders so when I do the install should be able to get some good photos.
I looked at the installation instructions and where it draws air looks the exact same as the stock box. It is just covered on the top, whereas the stock one, as you know, has rubber and plastic to close it off and draw the air, again, from the same area below.

I always wondered why the oil from K&N type filters contaminates the MAP sensor when the PCV vents oil into the air intake. Maybe the PCV is south of the MAP? (South as in on the engine side). I have heard of that issue, so I'd probably go dry, as well. I'll call Banks to find out if there is a flow and/or filtering difference.
 

moodywizard

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I looked at the installation instructions and where it draws air looks the exact same as the stock box. It is just covered on the top, whereas the stock one, as you know, has rubber and plastic to close it off and draw the air, again, from the same area below.

I always wondered why the oil from K&N type filters contaminates the MAP sensor when the PCV vents oil into the air intake. Maybe the PCV is south of the MAP? (South as in on the engine side). I have heard of that issue, so I'd probably go dry, as well. I'll call Banks to find out if there is a flow and/or filtering difference.
Yes I saw the install doc on the web site, however in the stock configuration it appears that the fresh air portion is right at the fender and above (opening is not below the fender line). Where as from the install pictures it looks to be at the same level just the opening is curled up like a tetris inverted rotated L haha Either way going to be a tight fit with the genesis dual battery and winch cables etc.

From past experience the wet filter usually flows a few more CFM's than dry filter. I dont believe there is a MAF sensor in the intake tube on the JL, there is a IAT though.
 

DanW

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I just spoke to a Banks rep. He said the flow and filtration are nearly identical with the two filters and they make recommendations based on location and climate. He said where I live they recommend dry in the winter and oiled in the summer. The reason is with the viscosity of the oil not doing as well in the winter. I asked about the MAF sensor issue and he said that can happen with filters that only have 2 or 3 layers of media, like a K&N. He said the Banks filter has 7 to 8 layers and that he has not heard a report of a Banks oiled filter, properly oiled, causing that problem on any engine. He said the air flow and filtration efficiency of both filters is basically the same in the optimal conditions for each. He said the main advantage of the oiled filter is that it can last longer before needing to be cleaned.

I then asked about the filtering efficiency specifically and he said they target the manufacturer's specifications for filtering efficiency with their filters, and that is why they typically have 7 to 8 layers of media, combined with a large filtering area.

Finally, I asked about a prefilter. He said they are really more for bugs and leaves, but not for dust. He said fine dust of the size you'd worry about goes right through a pre-filter, anyway, so they don't offer it on this application. He simply suggested that off-roading in a high dust environment would require much more frequent cleaning as the filter will load up much more quickly.

Interesting conversation. Now I have to decide if I really want to do this or if I'm just going to stay curious about it but happy with the stock setup. Hmmmm. I just sold a rifle to my nephew, so the $$ isn't an issue.

Dang Jeep is tugging at my wallet once again! Lol!

I think I'd probably order either just the dry or both filters. Run the dry in the winter, then swap for summer, which would give me a clean filter twice a year. Summer is when I'd want more air flow, anyway. That's when the top and doors are off and I'm driving the engine much harder and higher into the rpm range where you might actually feel the difference. I doubt a CAI makes much difference below 3000-4000rpm, anyway.
 

ChattVol

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I just spoke to a Banks rep. He said the flow and filtration are nearly identical with the two filters and they make recommendations based on location and climate. He said where I live they recommend dry in the winter and oiled in the summer. The reason is with the viscosity of the oil not doing as well in the winter. I asked about the MAF sensor issue and he said that can happen with filters that only have 2 or 3 layers of media, like a K&N. He said the Banks filter has 7 to 8 layers and that he has not heard a report of a Banks oiled filter, properly oiled, causing that problem on any engine. He said the air flow and filtration efficiency of both filters is basically the same in the optimal conditions for each. He said the main advantage of the oiled filter is that it can last longer before needing to be cleaned.

I then asked about the filtering efficiency specifically and he said they target the manufacturer's specifications for filtering efficiency with their filters, and that is why they typically have 7 to 8 layers of media, combined with a large filtering area.

Finally, I asked about a prefilter. He said they are really more for bugs and leaves, but not for dust. He said fine dust of the size you'd worry about goes right through a pre-filter, anyway, so they don't offer it on this application. He simply suggested that off-roading in a high dust environment would require much more frequent cleaning as the filter will load up much more quickly.

Interesting conversation. Now I have to decide if I really want to do this or if I'm just going to stay curious about it but happy with the stock setup. Hmmmm. I just sold a rifle to my nephew, so the $$ isn't an issue.

Dang Jeep is tugging at my wallet once again! Lol!

I think I'd probably order either just the dry or both filters. Run the dry in the winter, then swap for summer, which would give me a clean filter twice a year. Summer is when I'd want more air flow, anyway. That's when the top and doors are off and I'm driving the engine much harder and higher into the rpm range where you might actually feel the difference. I doubt a CAI makes much difference below 3000-4000rpm, anyway.
Thanks for sharing. It seems logical that Banks is choosing to market this with air flow stats and not publicize meaningful dyno info bc gains likely weren't impressive.
 

DanW

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Thanks for sharing. It seems logical that Banks is choosing to market this with air flow stats and not publicize meaningful dyno info bc gains likely weren't impressive.
I didn't ask about HP gains, but whatever AFE claims, Banks should do at least as well. Both are reputable. My nephew owns 4Piston Racing, which builds Honda drag racing and midget race engines. He considers those two companies to be highly reputable and probably the best in the industry, so he thinks it would be worthwhile.

That said, how much horsepower are people expecting? I'd think 5 to 10 hp up in the powerband is reasonable to expect and a nice little bump. But, this isn't the same as turbocharging or supercharging the engine, so the idea one might get 20hp or more indicates a lack of understanding about the potential of a Cai with this normally aspirated 3.6 engine. If it were turbocharged, it would probably gain more with better air flow, but since it is not, we have to understand there is not going to be a miraculous gain.

On the JK 3.6, they claim 8hp. I'd imagine you'd see something similar in the JL. Is it dramatic? No. Is it more horsepower? Yes. Ultimately, the buyer decides if it is worth it.

I'm not sure I'll do it, but if I do, I'll ask my nephew if he has a wheel dyno and if I can test the Jeep before and after, if it is set up for a vehicle like that.

So what can we expect? In the JK 3.6 the Banks moved 243cfi compared to stock 151. They claimed +8hp and +11 ft. lbs of torque. The JL goes from 430 stock to 782 for the Banks. That's an 82% increase in the JL versus more than 62% for the JK.

So, what could that mean? An educated guess would say probably a 10-12hp gain. Clearly in stock form, the JL made a huge gain over the JK, so I find that interesting. The Banks gets a whopping 782 Cfi in their JL version. For me, 10hp would be worth it and a reasonable expectation, especially coupled with improved sound.

AFE's claim of 43% gain over stock looks similar to the number Banks gave them. AFE claims 12hp and 12 ft lbs of torque.

So, that makes my guess for Banks to be conservative, if AFE's numbers are accurate. Also, maybe there are no big gains above the Cfi that AFE gets, so that would certainly encourage Banks to publish the CFI over horsepower gain. In other words, maybe AFE hit the point of diminishing return.

If I call them and consider ordering it, I'll ask for horsepower figures. I think, though, it would be safe to say they at least get what AFE got, which is a nice number.

I do like where the Banks gets its air, from the bottom and fed by the air scoop behind the grille. I think that air will be cooler than sucking it in from the top, as AFE does, which means hotter air from the engine compartment gets in there.

I know I'm rambling on here, but this stuff is fun to ponder. I just don't know if I want to drop 400 bucks and try it out or spend that money on something else, like rifle ammo or fishing gear, or maybe a Hi-Lift Jack and mount. Hmmm.
 

Flyslinger2

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How was the installation process? I read the manual and it looked fairly well documented.
 

moodywizard

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Installation was easy and straight forward, given I already removed the stock intake once before. Only thing I would caution is when installing is don’t bolt anything down until the tube, filter and everything is in place. Also when tightening the banks clear plastic window on top of the filter just go hand tight and not even tight really.. I cracked the plastic a bit on mine. Only cosmetic I’ll contact banks and see if they can send out a replacement.

my results are probably skewed because I’m regeared and running throttle commander already with dynomax muffler delete but you can definitely “feel” like it has some more powah and makes rumble noise when in high rpm like all other CAI I’ve run.
 

jperkins66

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Good to hear that install was smooth. I ordered today, and should be arriving soon.
 

moodywizard

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Going back to water fording depth, I saw the air duct from the front grill as you described. However on the stock intake the only fresh air intake is above the fender line vs this CAI where there is an opening below that level. Now there appears to be a plastic cover insert under the opening on the stock air intake box for what I don't know (maybe remove for more air flow or maybe its there because I have a rubicon?). So in doing this modification you might decrease the water fording by a few inches if anything. Then again if the water level is above your fender line you probably have bigger problems. :)
 
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AnnDee4444

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Another update. No peak power claims, but still some good info.

Banks Ram-Air® Intake for Jeep 3.6L Wrangler JL and Gladiator JT
New cold air intake with over-sized filter outflows and outfilters the competition.
ram-air-jeep-jl-600x338.jpg

Banks Power, an innovator in gas and diesel performance for over 60 years, introduces the latest in its Ram-Air® family of emissions compliant performance cold air intakes. The new system gives the Jeep 3.6L Wrangler JL and Gladiator JT exceptional horsepower and reliability by providing the engine with increased air density, airflow and the best filtration available.

The Ram-Air cold air intake adds a tested best-in-class airflow of 782 CFM, a gain of 82% over stock and 21.6% over its closest competitor. The system produces lower temperature air at higher pressure providing air density right at the throttle inlet. As a result, the Banks Ram-Air system boasts a 38% air density improvement compared to the stock intake, two times the increase of its closest competitor. This lower temperature air provides more thermal headroom before the engine hits the detonation limit of the fuel, resulting in more power on hot days.

Its durable molded plastic housing is fully enclosed, keeping power-robbing hot air in the engine bay where it belongs and not in the intake system. At the heart of the Ram-Air system is Banks’ new Big-Ass™ Filter element which is the largest and least restrictive in its class. Like all Banks Ram-Air intakes, the system was designed using computational fluid dynamics, followed by rigorous testing on the flow bench, dynamometer and on-road driving.

Available in both oiled and dry variations, Banks’ new Big-Ass™ filters offer 672 square inches of surface area, 21% more than their closest competitor. This allows for greater dirt collection and more miles between cleaning. The Ram-Air advantage becomes even more pronounced the dirtier the filter gets. Competitive filters clog up and become restrictive long before the Big-Ass Filter. Superior filtration is accomplished by using a proprietary multi-layer woven cloth that keeps even the finest dirt and debris out of the intake system while providing maximum airflow.

The Ram-Air also offers an appealing growl under acceleration while utilizing a Helmholtz resonator to eliminate the annoying drone found with competitive intake systems.

Features Overview

  • 782 CFM, 82% gain over stock
  • 38% air density improvement over stock
  • More thermal headroom on hot days
  • 672 in2 filter, 21% larger than closest competitor
  • Greater dirt capacity than competitors
  • More miles between cleanings
  • Appealing growl, no drone
The Banks Ram-Air cold air intake system (Part No. 41843 with oiled filter) (Part No. 41843-D with dry filter) fits all 2018-2020 Jeep 3.6L Wrangler JL and 2020 Gladiator JT engines and is available via Banks Power authorized dealers or bankspower.com at a low $390. CARB compliance in process.
Filter_Comparison_Email.jpg

41843_airflow.gif

41843_density.gif

The first of many reviews of the new Ram-Air system.
 
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AnnDee4444

AnnDee4444

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The important part from above:
The Ram-Air cold air intake adds a tested best-in-class airflow of 782 CFM, a gain of 82% over stock and 21.6% over its closest competitor. The system produces lower temperature air at higher pressure providing air density right at the throttle inlet. As a result, the Banks Ram-Air system boasts a 38% air density improvement compared to the stock intake, two times the increase of its closest competitor. This lower temperature air provides more thermal headroom before the engine hits the detonation limit of the fuel, resulting in more power on hot days.
 

Fire Burns

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Man I want to love this thing so bad! Obvious they did some awesome R&D. However, still keeping my wallet closed until we get some dyno numbers. Not worth it if at the end of the day if all it does is makes cool vroom vroom noises. I don't trust butt dynos. The power of suggestion is real...
 
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