Anyone using an Antirock Swaybar on their JL?

redsyphon

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Kpunk'n

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Not yet. However, I had front and rears on my 2013 and it was awesome! I'll probably go that way on my JLU eventually.
 
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redsyphon

redsyphon

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Page is no longer found and a quick search on their site for "JL" or "JLU" produces 0 results, so I wonder if they are pulling the product? :(
 

twisty

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It's there now, probably site update or ?. I had the anti rock on my TJ. They said the same thing about handling differences and I felt the rig handled better. Maybe the JL is different.
 
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redsyphon

redsyphon

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Yup, shows on many others including Northridge4x4's

I plan to order one towards the end of the month.
 


Jeeper2000

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I am curious how the JL will perform on and off road with just a rear antirock sway bar and keeping the stock front with electronic disconnect. Anyone do this yet?
 

Jeeper2000

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What issues, problems, or limitations are you running into that you believe would be addressed by a rear antirock?
I’m thinking you’d get more wheel travel on the rear with it installed. Possibly keep your body more level over obstacles? That’s why I’m asking, because I’d like to know if there would be any benefit.
 

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I’m thinking you’d get more wheel travel on the rear with it installed. Possibly keep your body more level over obstacles? That’s why I’m asking, because I’d like to know if there would be any benefit.
I don't have any experience with this swaybar, but from what I have read the Rubicon's travel seems to be limited by the shock length more than anything else. I haven't actually measured this though, and I'm sure someone will correct me if I am wrong.
 


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I had the Currie Anti-Rock on my 2012 2dr sport and didn't really care for it. I felt the on road handling was too much of a compromise and I am not sure the off road capabilities were really improved. I would probably just do a quick disconnect next time.
 

scrape

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I’m thinking you’d get more wheel travel on the rear with it installed. Possibly keep your body more level over obstacles? That’s why I’m asking, because I’d like to know if there would be any benefit.
More wheel travel and more stability are on opposite ends of the spectrum. Ideally you will want to find a balance. Generally the stock rear sway bar is tuned quite well when running with your front sway bar disconnected. If you add a front currie ARB then you will likely need to stiffen up the rear, which is where the rear currie ARB comes in, because it's adjustable.

You can get a pretty good idea of how your sway bars (or lack thereof) are balanced by running the jeep up an RTI ramp. If you don't run any sway bars, you will find that your rear will just flop over under the weight of the jeep with your front never getting into the bump stops. This will hurt your RTI score (if you care about that) but more importantly your body will be at a higher degree of tilt for any given distance up the ramp. The stock rear bar is just stiff enough to compensate for the weight transfer while climbing, adding enough springrate out back to push your front end down all the way.

Running a front currie with a stock rear causes a situation similar to running no front bar and no rear bar. The front will have too much effective rate and the rear will flop over. That's why I would only do aftermarket bars in pairs, they need to be dialed in and matched with eachother.

Another minor point that most people don't care about is handling. Jeeps have massive understeer and stiffening up the rear bar can help with that, to some extent anyway.

These are good products and serve a purpose, but it's not as simple or straight forward as most other bolt-on products.
 

2Wheel-Lee

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I just installed a set of front and rear AnitRocks on my JL. Sure, when you first put them on and drive on the street, it feels a little strange. I was just about to depart on a 2,700 mile road trip through Utah (including Moab and Sand Hollow), I was initially concerned about the drive ability. The second time I drove it, it felt totally normal and fine.

I really liked the stability during all of our offroad runs, and the articulation was great. All in all, I really liked how well the Jeep performed on the trip.
Just before the last day of wheeling, I stopped by American Adventure Labs to see about fitting their rear fender liners with the AntiRocks. At that time, it appeared the bars were slightly bent inward, and there was about 3/4" between the linkage arm nut and the frame. With this, the liners might barely fit. I don't recall the distance from the nuts to the frame after installation.

We went to Sand Hollow and then home. Upon inspection, apparently that last day of wheeling took its toll on the rear arms. They were now very close to the frame with hard marks that they'd been rubbing the frame. The passenger side was apparently hitting the bottom of the body close to the frame. The hardware was still tight. I think the arms are simply too damned flimsy (easy flexed laterally by hand).

I'm still waiting on RockJock (company changed names as of Jan 1) for what to do.

EVO 3.5" lift, 4.5" wheel back spacing, 37s.

Rear Driver AntiRock.jpg


Rear Pass AntiRock.jpg
 

alphalife9

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I just installed a set of front and rear AnitRocks on my JL. Sure, when you first put them on and drive on the street, it feels a little strange. I was just about to depart on a 2,700 mile road trip through Utah (including Moab and Sand Hollow), I was initially concerned about the drive ability. The second time I drove it, it felt totally normal and fine.

I really liked the stability during all of our offroad runs, and the articulation was great. All in all, I really liked how well the Jeep performed on the trip.
Just before the last day of wheeling, I stopped by American Adventure Labs to see about fitting their rear fender liners with the AntiRocks. At that time, it appeared the bars were slightly bent inward, and there was about 3/4" between the linkage arm nut and the frame. With this, the liners might barely fit. I don't recall the distance from the nuts to the frame after installation.

We went to Sand Hollow and then home. Upon inspection, apparently that last day of wheeling took its toll on the rear arms. They were now very close to the frame with hard marks that they'd been rubbing the frame. The passenger side was apparently hitting the bottom of the body close to the frame. The hardware was still tight. I think the arms are simply too damned flimsy (easy flexed laterally by hand).

I'm still waiting on RockJock (company changed names as of Jan 1) for what to do.

EVO 3.5" lift, 4.5" wheel back spacing, 37s.

Rear Driver AntiRock.jpg


Rear Pass AntiRock.jpg
wow that's disappointing. Hopefully they will sort it out for you soon. Can you expand on the body roll on-road and the articulation offroad? More of both over stock? I've been eyeing their rear setup.
 

2Wheel-Lee

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wow that's disappointing. Hopefully they will sort it out for you soon. Can you expand on the body roll on-road and the articulation offroad? More of both over stock? I've been eyeing their rear setup.
I achieved full articulation with the stock JLUR setup and with the AntiRocks, so my point was that they didn't inhibit articulation (some people think they do).

On road, yes, the body leans a bit more in turns. At first, it's a bit unnerving. Though I'm kind of used to that feel, since my lifted Samurai on 31s doesn't have a sway bar on it anymore. Once you get used to a little more body roll, everything is fine. I still rail it on freeway onramps and interchanges - just with a little more body roll.

Speed runs offroad feel better. I don't mean just dirt road, but rough stuff where I'm into my King bump stops. With the stock Rubicon bar, it's connected at speed (I didn't experiment with Tazer programming of it), and the front doesn't "dance" in the rough as well the AntiRock setup. And I use the term dance kind of meaning that with the AntiRocks, it goes with the terrain better at speed. I need to figure out a way to better explain this - sorry.

For lower speed crawling, I was in a lot of off-camber sections with obstacles, and the AntiRocks made the handling a bit more predictable, I thought.

 

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