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Anyone installed their own new Breaks (Pads & Rotors)?

timn1984

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Just wanted some advice and guidance to DIY break install. I have a Sahara JL 2018 with HD breaks that squeak. Dealer told me that it may need new rotors, etc... at a cost of about $1700. Looking to Replace them myself this summer when the weather gets warmer. Any advice on DIY install/problems/secrets to success? And what type of breaks? I read somewhere that the front should be the slotted/holed and the rear should be smooth rotors. Any advice? Thanks in advance.
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SSinGA

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Remove the tires and inspect the pads and rotors. If you don't have any serious gouging in the rotor and no pulsing, they are fine. Check the pad face for glazing. You can add some brake grease to the back of the pads where they touch the caliper piston which could quiet them down.

Worst case, get some Powerstop Z36 pads and put them in.
 

blnewt

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Should be a simple DIY, and ditto what @SSinGA posted, Powerstop Z36 pads (best prices on rockauto.com) should be all you really need. The great majority of the time rotor problems aren't the rotor itself, but uneven pad deposits resulting in a vibrating pedal at slowdown. This can be cured most of the time by doing a series of hard braking to scrub the rotors (evening out the pad deposits).

Only time you need new rotors (typically) is if you really overheated them causing them to get severely warped, so much so that they can't be machined down. Another reason would be if you let the pads go well beyond the wear wires so there was metal on metal grinding. And lastly if the rotors are so old that the pads have finally worn them down thinner than req'd spec, but that is typically many years of use.

Oh, and it's brakes, not breaks, unless they're truly broken :)
 

Brad41

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I’d be surprised if your rotors are bad already. (Even your pads honestly) how many miles on the Jeep?
 

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Shepherd12

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You might only need to grease yours pads. A lot of times, this is the reason they squeak.
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timn1984

timn1984

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Should be a simple DIY, and ditto what @SSinGA posted, Powerstop Z36 pads (best prices on rockauto.com) should be all you really need. The great majority of the time rotor problems aren't the rotor itself, but uneven pad deposits resulting in a vibrating pedal at slowdown. This can be cured most of the time by doing a series of hard braking to scrub the rotors (evening out the pad deposits).

Only time you need new rotors (typically) is if you really overheated them causing them to get severely warped, so much so that they can't be machined down. Another reason would be if you let the pads go well beyond the wear wires so there was metal on metal grinding. And lastly if the rotors are so old that the pads have finally worn them down thinner than req'd spec, but that is typically many years of use.

Oh, and it's brakes, not breaks, unless they're truly broken :)
Yep, maybe it was a Freudian slip, brakes, dammit! I’m usually the one to catch misspellings. It’s autocorrect, have to blame something. Thanks for the reply and info, makes me feel a little better about just replacing the pads.
 
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timn1984

timn1984

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limeade

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Brakes are one of the most cost effective maintenance items you can do yourself versus having the dealer do it. I almost always do my own brakes, except for when I first bought an Audi. After paying the Audi dealer $400 per axle, I watched a couple DIY videos and started doing them myself. Now my costs are $200 per axle and my pads/rotors are lasting 3 times as long as the factory brakes.

I personally like the Centric (and Stop Tech, which is their performance line) brand rotors and ceramic pads.

However, I would recommend having your rotors resurfaced. This will remove any glazing and ensure you have a clean and correct surface to bed-in your new pads. It's typically $20-$25 per rotor for resurfacing.

Watch the DIY videos and it should be pretty easy. Make sure you have a large C clamp and a block of wood to push the pistons back into the calipers. Remove the brake fluid reservoir cap before moving the calipers though and watch the fluid level. It is possible the fluid could overflow the reservoir and brake fluid is harmful to painted surfaces. Use a turkey baster or suction device to remove some fluid if needed. Have extra fluid (DOT 3 I believe) to top off the system.

Use disc brake grease only on those lubrication points as identified as above. I've used Sil-Glyde (from Napa) for years with great success.
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