Any tips on extra break-in precaution for 2.0l Turbo JLU?

Capricorn

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Are there any extra precautions in break-in on 2.0L E-Torque over the 6 cylinder V6 Pentastar?
And any difference(s) on a cold start?

The manual does not state anything additional but I would appreciate any tips from the brain trust of this forum.
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Poffnstuff

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Are there any extra precautions in break-in on 2.0L E-Torque over the 6 cylinder V6 Pentastar?
And any difference(s) on a cold start?

The manual does not state anything additional but I would appreciate any tips from the brain trust of this forum.
Drive it like you stole it.
 

Blood Type J+

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Are there any extra precautions in break-in on 2.0L E-Torque over the 6 cylinder V6 Pentastar?
And any difference(s) on a cold start?

The manual does not state anything additional but I would appreciate any tips from the brain trust of this forum.
It's probably already been to redline in intial QC but I do like to baby my engines for the first 1000 miles and then not get terribly crazy for another 1000 to let the cylinders and rings more fully seat before I thrash it. If you want to *do* something, you can always get an extra, early oil/filter change at 500-1000 and check the oil to be sure it looks normal and comes out particle-free.
 

Rubi

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Are there any extra precautions in break-in on 2.0L E-Torque over the 6 cylinder V6 Pentastar?
And any difference(s) on a cold start?

The manual does not state anything additional but I would appreciate any tips from the brain trust of this forum.
The number one thing to do is to vary the rpm’s all the time until you reach 1k miles. Don’t consistently stay with the same engine speed. The best break-in locations are in cities where you’re constantly changing the engine speed between street lights and stop signs. You live in Vegas so this is the perfect environment. Also; don’t sit and idle for extended periods of time. As Blood Type J+ said; change the oil and filter at least at 1k miles.
 

rustyshakelford

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I never change the oil early. Unless it can be 100% confirmed that these don’t come with any type of break in oil I’ll run it until it tells me to change it. These engines aren't like ones built in the 80s. They are precision built with higher tolerances than ever before. The days of having significant metal in the oil after being built are long over. Some call it preventive maintenance and to each their own, but to me, it’s wasteful

Brett
 

LincolnSixAlpha

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It's probably already been to redline in intial QC but I do like to baby my engines for the first 1000 miles and then not get terribly crazy for another 1000 to let the cylinders and rings more fully seat before I thrash it. If you want to *do* something, you can always get an extra, early oil/filter change at 500-1000 and check the oil to be sure it looks normal and comes out particle-free.
While I can respect your thinking, I once thought as you do. But I read some articles on various motors (automobile, and otherwise) being broken in "softly", vs "under load". Surmise it to say the term "run it like you stole it" in every case seemed to indicate much, much better ring sealing against the cylinder walls, thus stronger engines with little to no compression gas blow by. However, the engines that were broken in "softly" were typically underpowered, and experienced the aforementioned blow-by, and other tendencies as a result of poor ring sealing.

That said, typically the sealing is done within the first handful of miles anyhow, and perhaps even more likely on a "cold" running-in of the engine done in the factory during build time, then followed by a hot run-in as it's exiting the line.

Now I'm no expert, just my opinion of what I've read over the years. Worth a good read, but since I've spent the time to research I've changed my methods for break-in. Of importance to me is the application of deceleration compression pushing on the rings with no engine load (ie giving throttle). I usually find a good location where I'm on and off the gas, up and down hills, with the goal to apply more vehicle load onto the engine as it's own weight is pushing the crank to spin, aka engine breaking. That said, I'm certainly not afraid to "get into it" on a fresh engine. I've applied this thinking to many vehicles, including my motorcycles as well.

I do think it is important to change the oil fairly early on to remove any "build/break-in" particles from the oil as quickly as possible.

My 2c worth anyhow. Run it like you stole it.
 

wvgasguy

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Owners manual says a 300 mile breakin period. No full throtle at low speeds but an occasional burst while already at highway speeds would be good for it.
 
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