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AMSOIL are you folks believers?

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sf5211

sf5211

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Also may I add, the mechanic at the dealership said to now start using 5W-20 up from 0W-20 that I was using. He said 5W-20 for the rest of the life of the engine.
 

NWJeepr

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No; FCA reduced the capacity from 6 to 5 when the 2017+ engine redesign happened. Weight reduction for MPG...

PPE does make a 6qt pan for the JL.
It's a win for maintainability, though. Oh how I hate finding a great deal on a 1.25 gallon jug of oil (5 quarts) and then having to be fleeced for the 6th quart at regular price or buying too much oil and then having to measure out quarts.

As long as the oil is properly cooled, 5 quarts should serve the 3.6 just fine, with adequate change intervals.
 

CarbonSteel

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It's a win for maintainability, though. Oh how I hate finding a great deal on a 1.25 gallon jug of oil (5 quarts) and then having to be fleeced for the 6th quart at regular price or buying too much oil and then having to measure out quarts.

As long as the oil is properly cooled, 5 quarts should serve the 3.6 just fine, with adequate change intervals.
Perhaps but I buy mine in bulk anyway. The Ford F-150 truck I had prior to the Jeep took 7 QTs so I would buy seven 5QT jugs when on sale to prevent what you describe. The PowerStroke took 14 QTs so it would be 2.5 gallon jugs.

The oil cooler and remote filter mount project I am doing will likely push me up to 7QTs so I'll continue my regime of buying when on sale.
 

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Also may I add, the mechanic at the dealership said to now start using 5W-20 up from 0W-20 that I was using. He said 5W-20 for the rest of the life of the engine.
Also may I add, the mechanic at the dealership said to now start using 5W-20 up from 0W-20 that I was using. He said 5W-20 for the rest of the life of the engine.
I use that weight but I live down south ...5W seems a bit risky for winter startups to me...the recommendation seems odd..
 

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Wow, 8 pages on oil. AMSOIL always gets people riled up. If not for the MLM part, no one would really care.
 

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Also may I add, the mechanic at the dealership said to now start using 5W-20 up from 0W-20 that I was using. He said 5W-20 for the rest of the life of the engine.
Given that "0" oils typically have more "synthetics" in them to meet the "0" winter requirement, it would seem counter intuitive to switch to a "5" though it can depend on your climate and how cold it is in the winter.

I would switch to a 0W-30 and rest easy...
 

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I used Amsoil gear oil in my diffs for years. Notbecause I prefer the brand, but simply because they had the best packaging. Now others are selling theirs in those little bags, so I don’t see the need to stick with Amsoil once I go through the case I have on hand.
 

acacia052

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It really doesn’t matter what oil you run as long as you use the right api standard for your vehicle. SN,ST,NT whatever it is. They all have to meet certain requirements. It can be amsoil or super tech. Same damn thing. The only difference is the amt of additives. Zinc, molybdenum. I change my oil at 3k mi regardless. It’s black with carbon, and the $45 for an oil change to protect my $30k jeep is a no brainer. Go much over that, regardless of what bs mfg tell you , and you’re inviting trouble down the line.
 

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I used Amsoil gear oil in my diffs for years. Notbecause I prefer the brand, but simply because they had the best packaging. Now others are selling theirs in those little bags, so I don’t see the need to stick with Amsoil once I go through the case I have on hand.
I will sing the praises of Amsoil gear oil. I think it is their best offering and (aside from Dana 44 Advanteks) after break-in and initial oil change most axles can run 100K miles and Amsoil holds up well.

For example, Amsoil maintained viscosity retention better than Motorcraft in my 2010 Ford F-150. If the axles in our Jeeps did not generate so much wear metal, I would run Amsoil in them, but I change it more often so it does not make sense.

Jeep Wrangler JL AMSOIL are you folks believers? FX4
 

Token

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I will sing the praises of Amsoil gear oil. I think it is their best offering and (aside from Dana 44 Advanteks) after break-in and initial oil change most axles can run 100K miles and Amsoil holds up well.

For example, Amsoil maintained viscosity retention better than Motorcraft in my 2010 Ford F-150. If the axles in our Jeeps did not generate so much wear metal, I would run Amsoil in them, but I change it more often so it does not make sense.

Jeep Wrangler JL AMSOIL are you folks believers? FX4
Yeah, longevity is not really a concern for me. The trails I wheel regularly all have plenty of water crossings.
So fluid changes ARE going to happen far more frequently than “manufacturer’s suggestions”.
I have extended the vents, and pay attention when I’m wheeling, but I also live in an area that gets well below freezing in winter, and my Jeep sits a lot, so all of the fluids will get changed before winter, even if it has only been 10,000miles.
The bags were just so convenient for filling differentials and
the transfer case.
 

jjvincent

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The funny part is that the engine will outlast the rest of the vehicle. If you go to any salvage yard, they have an overabundance of used engines. Even in racing when we need a spare motor, we buy them from a salvage yard. For when I raced my BMW, I typically bought used motors from a BMW X3 or X5. This was because Suzy Soccer Mom drove it easy and most likely, did not maintain it well like Jeep owners do. So pull one apart that's full of sludge, clean it up and then I measured things like the main and rod bearing clearances. Same for cylinder bores and cam bearing clearances. Every time, the bearings looked like new, the clearances were really close to new and the bore pretty much showed barely any wear (even the machining marks were still in it). Makes you wonder why it wasn't shot. Probably had no good of oil in it, went way overdue on mileage and about a 1/4" of sludge in the pan. This is on a 150K motor. Seen it many times.

As for back in the day, 150K was a wore out engine (I remember when 60K miles was considered high mileage). Yet today, it's not. I see lots of old timer information that keeps getting spread when it comes to oil. Some people just live in 1975 and apply that to 2023.

I suggest we move this discussion to drum vs disk brakes or bias ply vs steel belted radials. Maybe leaded gas vs unleaded or how all emission devices have decreased the performance of cars vs the early 70's. An early 70's muscle car made like 2000 hp. Right? Today, it's like 50 hp.
 

joliett

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What s lot of B.S. Pages of specs and opinions, from mechanics and owners, to manufacturers. Point is, do what the OWNER'S MANUAL requires. Nothing else really matters...unless you're a certified industry oil expert or licensed P.E ENGINEER, and and prepared to back up your claim in court if your engine blows up.
 

jjvincent

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Also, in the world of racing, I probably could count on one hand, they guys that use AMSOIL. I grew up around racing. For it being a superior product and racers spend lots of money on those products, they would switch and go on with it. Yet they do not. The amount of money we spend on tires and brakes, AMSOIL is a drop in the bucket. Yet teams do not. I don't understand. We want the best because we do keep track of time on an engine.

So when you have to rebuild a motor after 40 hours because it makes less on the dyno and the crankcase pressure is getting too high, you'd think that just using AMSOIL with it's superior product would get us further. Maybe to 80 hrs. A $50K refresh is not cheap as compared to just sticking AMSOIL in it. It's almost like racers have tried it and found no difference. Maybe they never have. I consider, racing to be severe duty. Maybe it's not.
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