Almost Spun Out - What Went Wrong?

IndustrialAction

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Ok, I know some people are going to troll me for posting this but I'm going to tell my story anyway and ask for advice. If you're going to tear me up, just ignore the thread...

This evening I was driving out of a parking deck onto a wet road. It wasn't raining but had been earlier in the day. I was making a left and a car across the street suddenly sped up and tried to make the right in front of me. When he saw me he slowed down so I gave it some skinny pedal to get in-front so he could still turn.

That's when things got hairy.

The back-end slid out hard to the right and I was almost parallel to the road across two lanes, I immediately let off the gas and gently tried to correct the wheel. The Jeep lurched back the opposite way and spun side-ways the other way. At this point, I'm not touching either pedal. The slide stopped and I was able to turn back on to the road properly and went on my merry way.

This all happened in just a couple of seconds. Must have looked ridiculous to anyone who saw it and certainly made my butt pucker.

So, yes, it was slick out and I'm in a rear-wheel drive vehicle that probably shouldn't have been given gas on a slick turn but still, the behavior seemed a bit much. I didn't look at the dash but I'm pretty certain the traction control didn't engage at all.

This isn't the first time I've had the back-end slide but it is certainly the largest loss of control I've experienced in it.

My first question is, should the traction control have kicked in, and, if it did, would it have helped? And second is, how do I prevent it again aside from not being a dummy with the pedal on a slick road?

Also, any chance my heavy a$$ rear tire with the offset had anything to do with the Jeep becoming a pendulum? Would a Teraflex carrier with a better mounting position help? Seemed like a trebuchet sort of effect to me.

Anyway, that's my story. Let me know what you think. Jeep specs are in my signature





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oceanblue2019

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Ok, I know some people are going to troll me for posting this but I'm going to tell my story anyway and ask for advice. If you're going to tear me up, just ignore the thread...

This evening I was driving out of a parking deck onto a wet road. It wasn't raining but had been earlier in the day. I was making a left and a car across the street suddenly sped up and tried to make the right in front of me. When he saw me he slowed down so I gave it some skinny pedal to get in-front so he could still turn.

That's when things got hairy.

The back-end slid out hard to the right and I was almost parallel to the road across two lanes, I immediately let off the gas and gently tried to correct the wheel. The Jeep lurched back the opposite way and spun side-ways the other way. At this point, I'm not touching either pedal. The slide stopped and I was able to turn back on to the road properly and went on my merry way.

This all happened in just a couple of seconds. Must have looked ridiculous to anyone who saw it and certainly made my butt pucker.

So, yes, it was slick out and I'm in a rear-wheel drive vehicle that probably shouldn't have been given gas on a slick turn but still, the behavior seemed a bit much. I didn't look at the dash but I'm pretty certain the traction control didn't engage at all.

This isn't the first time I've had the back-end slide but it is certainly the largest loss of control I've experienced in it.

My first question is, should the traction control have kicked in, and, if it did, would it have helped? And second is, how do I prevent it again aside from not being a dummy with the pedal on a slick road?

Also, any chance my heavy a$$ rear tire with the offset had anything to do with the Jeep becoming a pendulum? Would a Teraflex carrier with a better mounting position help? Seemed like a trebuchet sort of effect to me.

Anyway, that's my story. Let me know what you think. Jeep specs are in my signature
Find a empty parking lot on a rainy day and learn how the Jeep handles. In slick roads they can be pretty sketchy until put into 4H.
 
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IndustrialAction

IndustrialAction

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Find a empty parking lot on a rainy day and learn how the Jeep handles. In slick roads they can be pretty sketchy until put into 4H.
For the most part I don't have issues but a few turns have been sketchy. If it is crazy pouring out I'll throw it in 4H but didn't think today's situation called for it
 

TravisRogers

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The Wrangler is one of the more squirrelly vehicles when it comes to handling in wet conditions. Noticed it right away. I’ve spun it a couple of times taking an exit ramp not even accelerating. My G Wagon handled terribly, too, but it weighed twice as much so it wasn’t as likely to just release and slide all over like the Wrangler.

I think the terrible stock tires play a role in that, too. Braking hard on the highway in the rain turns the Wrangler into a figure skater, gliding across the surface of the wet pavement all mimbly-bimbly. Except without the daddy issues and the bowed legs.
 

VA72mlibu

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Sounds a little like lift throttle oversteer. When you release the throttle the Vehicle’s weight transfers forward, reducing traction on the rear tires and increasing traction on your turned front tires. Remember, always...”In a spin, both feet in”.
 

GeeBee

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I had a couple of scary moments on the stock M/T tyres that were fitted to my Rubicon - they were hopeless on wet asphalt. Coming out of T-junctions I had to drive it as if I was on slick ice or I'd get rear wheel spin with the back end sliding out followed by a whip the other way once I regained traction.

I swapped to A/T's and it behaves a lot better but it's still no sports car! I think the JL's straight line acceleration lulls you into a false sense of security as it's enormous fun on the open road, but it still needs a lot of respect through the corners as it's a tall vehicle with heavy axles mated to a relatively light body with unforgiving suspension in-between. Great for off-road but skippy as hell on it so if you hit a bump when taking a corner with enthusiasm you better hang on tight :)
 
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IndustrialAction

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Should get the selec-trac full-time 4wd if you're in slippery conditions often
We tend to get a lot of rain in the spring but are relatively dry otherwise. I considered a Sahara/MOAB but opted for the Rubicon for a number of other reasons
 

Headbarcode

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We tend to get a lot of rain in the spring but are relatively dry otherwise. I considered a Sahara/MOAB but opted for the Rubicon for a number of other reasons
They say that the roads are more slippery at the beginning of a raining, or after not enough rain has dropped. This is because the oils and other contaminants are raised out of the road surface as the heavier water absorbs into it. Given enough water volume, this film will be washed away. Not enough water volume, and your driving through that film. Your making a left turn caused you to cross that strip of less-beaten-path, which could only amplify the slippery condition. A sudden, albeit slight throttle input also didn't help when coupled with centrifugal force.

This babble only came about because you described your neck of the woods as not seeing much rain outside of a season that has been hibernating for several months now.
 

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Ok, I know some people are going to troll me for posting this but I'm going to tell my story anyway and ask for advice. If you're going to tear me up, just ignore the thread...

This evening I was driving out of a parking deck onto a wet road. It wasn't raining but had been earlier in the day. I was making a left and a car across the street suddenly sped up and tried to make the right in front of me. When he saw me he slowed down so I gave it some skinny pedal to get in-front so he could still turn.

That's when things got hairy.

The back-end slid out hard to the right and I was almost parallel to the road across two lanes, I immediately let off the gas and gently tried to correct the wheel. The Jeep lurched back the opposite way and spun side-ways the other way. At this point, I'm not touching either pedal. The slide stopped and I was able to turn back on to the road properly and went on my merry way.

This all happened in just a couple of seconds. Must have looked ridiculous to anyone who saw it and certainly made my butt pucker.

So, yes, it was slick out and I'm in a rear-wheel drive vehicle that probably shouldn't have been given gas on a slick turn but still, the behavior seemed a bit much. I didn't look at the dash but I'm pretty certain the traction control didn't engage at all.

This isn't the first time I've had the back-end slide but it is certainly the largest loss of control I've experienced in it.

My first question is, should the traction control have kicked in, and, if it did, would it have helped? And second is, how do I prevent it again aside from not being a dummy with the pedal on a slick road?

Also, any chance my heavy a$$ rear tire with the offset had anything to do with the Jeep becoming a pendulum? Would a Teraflex carrier with a better mounting position help? Seemed like a trebuchet sort of effect to me.

Anyway, that's my story. Let me know what you think. Jeep specs are in my signature
I’ve had this happen often in wet conditions as well. Can someone answer the question, does traction control or should traction control intervene or does it only work in 4WD to correct the slide?
 

TravisRogers

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I’ve had this happen often in wet conditions as well. Can someone answer the question, does traction control or should traction control intervene or does it only work in 4WD to correct the slide?
The traction control we have isn’t like the one you get on a luxury vehicle. While a BMW (for example) applies brakes and limits throttle on individual wheels to correct your trajectory, the Wrangler only limits overall throttle input when it senses your wheels are spinning.
 

VA72mlibu

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The Jeep is supposed to have Electronic Stability Control but not sure what the parameters are. You may have been going too slow for the system to correct the skid.
 
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IndustrialAction

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I’ve had this happen often in wet conditions as well. Can someone answer the question, does traction control or should traction control intervene or does it only work in 4WD to correct the slide?
The traction control we have isn’t like the one you get on a luxury vehicle. While a BMW (for example) applies brakes and limits throttle on individual wheels to correct your trajectory, the Wrangler only limits overall throttle input when it senses your wheels are spinning.
True, but I'm 99% sure it didn't even engage. Should it have? If it had, would it have helped?
 

TravisRogers

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True, but I'm 99% sure it didn't even engage. Should it have? If it had, would it have helped?
If you were accelerating and your wheels started spinning, yes, the ESS should have cut your throttle. If your rear end was sliding without your foot being on the gas, there’s nothing the ESS would have been able to do. It sounds like our momentum from the correction was what caused you to continue to slide.

If you want to see if your ESS is working, hose down your front yard, take the Wrangler on the grass and punch the gas. If it cuts your throttle, it works. Don’t forget to yell, “Yeehaw!” I find it helps with the neighbors. They’ll just think you’ve lost it and leave you alone.
 

Rploaded

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I call it drift mode and I do it on purpose from time to time, it’s easy to do with an open rear end. However it’s really all about the skinny pedal which in your case was used to aggressively in first gear.
 

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