50 MPGe - What that really means

VNT

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Lets face it, people buying these are in it for the green, 7500$ green LOL

I am curious to see the early folks who buy these what they actually see for mileage. I know my two Wranglers 4 dr with 3.6 Autos no E-TQ are around 22 mpg over all.

I have also built a Sahara with 4Xe with the options I like, MSRP of 57210, Invoice 54110 and then built a similiar equiped Sahara with 3.6EQT ( way I would get one) and the 4XE is only about 500$ more since they charge 3000$ for a 3.6 Auto, the 4xe comes with the anti spin and leather.

So one can get the 4xe and save 7000 or so after Gov Kick Back!





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dudemind

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Jeep says the 4xe has a range of 'almost' 400 miles, let's call it 395 miles.
We know it can travel 25 miles on electricity alone, that leaves a range of 370 miles.
Pretty sure I read it has a 17.2 gal fuel tank, so I would expect the hybrid system to average around 21.5 mpg best- case scenario.
AGREE the whole 'MPGe' thing is Very misleading at best (deceptive marketing more likely)
Agree that MPGe as a metric is incredibly misleading. But I wouldn't say that's Jeep marketing team's fault. The metric itself was invented for the sole purpose of upselling alternative energy vehicles to a confused and skeptical public. It is composed of several simplifying or outright false assumptions. Note that I am not a Jeep apologetic by any means. In fact, I generally don't get along with other Jeep owners at all because I refuse to buy into the cult of Jeepness. That said, the 4xe checks enough boxes to convince me to give it a try. I had some serious qualms with my first JL, but the 4xe might just solve most of them. When I priced up versus my 2-door Bronco build (which I still have a reservation for, and might still buy), the 4xe just made a ton of sense.
 

BMoreJLU

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In E Selec 'electric only mode', you can travel approximately 25 miles without starting the engine, so you could technically never run the gas engine and operate the vehicle for short distances on electric only indefinitely as long as you have access to charging. Depending on your electric utility rates, preferential EV programs or overnight charging rates (charging can be scheduled to run on the Jeep electric pages to take advantage of these rates), this could be a huge savings. My understanding is even in E Selec, there is programming to run the engine periodically as gas engines don't like to sit unused but need to circulate oil, coolant, fuel etc... periodically to maintain a good state of operation.

Worst case hypothetical scenario; completely depleted battery at the start of a 600 mile one day trip on the interstate going 70+mph. I suspect in this case you would get worse overall MPG rating than a standard 2.0L turbo engine-only Wrangler as you are carrying 600+(?) lbs more weight and recharging the battery pack. In this scenario the 3.0L diesel would be most efficient. Part of the fun of owning a vehicle like the 4xe is understanding its strengths and weaknesses and using it accordingly.
This really depends, but you'd be surprised at how efficient these powertrains can be. In the past 4 years I've owned 2 Wranglers ('07 JKU, '18 JLU), one standard hybrid (Kia Optima) 2 fully electric cars (e-Golf, LEAF SL PLUS). There is a benefit to the highway that you'll see and that's coasting. If you're in an ICE vehicle, your engine is running regardless of if you need the power or not. In hybrids, PHEVs, and BEVs if you're coasting or slowing then that engine can turn off (if in a hybrid or PHEV) and you won't use any fuel over that time AND, depending on your regenerative braking setting, you'll even be putting energy back into the battery. Driving highways from MD to IL in my hybrid Optima there were several long downhill slopes where my engine could turn off and I would coast down the hill, maintaining speed and charge my battery enough to get down the road a while without the gas engine kicking back in for a bit.
 

BMoreJLU

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I think MGPe is the best we are going to have for a while as it does relate to something people know. When you're in a vehicle that is fully electric the metric that is easier to use (that actually relates to the fuel (battery) capacity is mi/kWh. In ideal conditions (nice weather, city driving) in my eGolf I could get 4.4mi/kWh. In my LEAF I was lucky to get 4mi/kWh in ideal conditions, likely because the LEAF with the larger battery pack is so much heavier and it's less efficient drag wise. The SL PLUS battery capacity is 62kWh, but only 56kWh is usable. So I can take my efficiency muliplied by capacity to find my range (4mi/kWh * 56kWh = 224 miles).
 

calemasters

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Demonic

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On a road trip where you on the highway and not using the brakes much, there's not much regeneration occurring.
Yes, that's why hybrids will often have better city MPG ratings than highway MPG ratings. Of course there will be conditions where a hybrid isn't as beneficial, but overall even a non-plug-in hybrid will still get better mileage than a ICE. The plug in part is just an added bonus.
 
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TDangelo1219

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It will be interesting to see if Jeep uses the same mpg computer that they used on the Pacifica Hybrid. (I have no reason to think they won't) In my Pacifica it won't show 99 mpg when your only using the battery like most PHEV's. (My Volvo will show 199 mpg as long as your in electric mode) They actually have the MPGe figured into the trip computer. So when your taking off in all electric mode you'll see your instant MPG in the low 20's because you are using a lot of energy to get the vehicle moving. So my trip computer will frequently show you're getting in the high 40's with combined driving, where my Volvo will show something like 173 MPG. Both approaches are a bit flawed, but I think the Pacifica is a little more accurate. In short I've calculated that it costs me .04 cents per mile in all electric mode and .10 cents per mile when using gas over 62,000 miles. I'm expecting similar numbers in my 4Xe.
 
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hybrid3.0

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The real strength of the electric motor is in town and start-stop situations as 100% torque is generated at 0 rpm. In these situations where one is driving in hybrid mode, I suspect one could see substantially improved gas mileage but the electricity used also has a cost. This article does a good job explaining mpge and the economics of a PHEV:
https://cars.usnews.com/cars-trucks/what-is-mpge
 

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