3.6L vs 2.0 turbo?? Pros and cons of both??

emptyminded42

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Yet...the 2.0T is not offered on JT. So something in the little turbo must not hold up.

It is true that engines can be designed to handle high stresses. But not when cost-cutting is a major factor. After all, this is FCA. They would make engines out of recycled wax if it gave them one extra penny in profits.
Maybe because it's several hundred pounds heavier, rated for higher towing weights off the bat, and in-actual-fact a truck, not an SUV. It also may not have had adequate time to test the drivetrain and/or truck buyers would refuse a 2.0T but Wrangler owners might be more comfortable with it. There's all sorts of legitimate reasons why the Gladiator doesn't have the 2.0 but the Wranglers do. Different vehicle, different market, different buyer, different usage.

And every manufacturer would sell a kidney to save a buck in manufacturing costs. Yet somehow modern turbos are just fine (assuming your Focus RS got the Focus head gasket and not the Mustang one).

I’ve driven the pentastar in different FCA vehicles and I have a 2.3L eco boost mustang. NA is going to be more reliable because it has less parts and heat compared to a FI engine. That being said, modern day turbos are way more reliable than what they used to make.

If you want an NA motor, buy the pentastar. It might be getting replaced by FCA’s new gas 3.0L turbo inline 6 (rumored for 2022/2023 model year). If I had the money to buy a Rubicon right now, I’d probably try and go 2.0 for the extra power to compensate for the extra weight when modded. I’m honestly just waiting for the new engine though. A gas 3.0L inline 6 is going to be a monster and will not have to work as hard as a 2.0L turbo 4 to move a 4500lb box.
Again, fewer part count isn't definite when you're talking I4 turbo vs. V6. Recall double the heads, double the valvetrains, double the exhausts, and all the timing components. A turbo is really not complex. Controlling it via ECU might be, but mechanically they are quite simple.

A nice inline 6 would be sweet, but slapping turbos on that reminds me of the oh-so-wonderful twin turbo E90 BMWs that were.... not exactly the worlds most reliable and trouble-free engines of all time. Reverting to single turbo along with other tweaks made them much, much more reliable.

I guess my point is there's no inherent problem with a I4 turbo vs. V6 - it all comes down to design and manufacturing. If FCA can make their V6 reliable, no reason they couldn't also make a bulletproof I4 turbo. It's a global engine and the Alfa Romeo Giulia seems plenty reliable with the 2.0T. The TTV6 Quadrifoglio is a whole different ballgame.





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Revolution_322

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Which is why the 2.0 is not offered in the JT. On a lease or something your going to sell in 4 years either one is good. Long term 3.6 all day.
Also , water cooled EGR, air charge intercool in addition to standard radiator.
 

aldo98229

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Maybe because it's several hundred pounds heavier, rated for higher towing weights off the bat, and in-actual-fact a truck, not an SUV. It also may not have had adequate time to test the drivetrain and/or truck buyers would refuse a 2.0T but Wrangler owners might be more comfortable with it. There's all sorts of legitimate reasons why the Gladiator doesn't have the 2.0 but the Wranglers do. Different vehicle, different market, different buyer, different usage.

And every manufacturer would sell a kidney to save a buck in manufacturing costs. Yet somehow modern turbos are just fine (assuming your Focus RS got the Focus head gasket and not the Mustang one).



Again, fewer part count isn't definite when you're talking I4 turbo vs. V6. Recall double the heads, double the valvetrains, double the exhausts, and all the timing components. A turbo is really not complex. Controlling it via ECU might be, but mechanically they are quite simple.

A nice inline 6 would be sweet, but slapping turbos on that reminds me of the oh-so-wonderful twin turbo E90 BMWs that were.... not exactly the worlds most reliable and trouble-free engines of all time. Reverting to single turbo along with other tweaks made them much, much more reliable.

I guess my point is there's no inherent problem with a I4 turbo vs. V6 - it all comes down to design and manufacturing. If FCA can make their V6 reliable, no reason they couldn't also make a bulletproof I4 turbo. It's a global engine and the Alfa Romeo Giulia seems plenty reliable with the 2.0T. The TTV6 Quadrifoglio is a whole different ballgame.
Also, the 2.0T was put into Wrangler in part to circumvent tax regulations in many parts of the world.

Jeep does not have global aspirations for Gladiator any time soon, so the need to offer a 2.0T on JT are not there.
 

KLMkrieger

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I am the owner of a JL Rubicon with the 2.0 turbo in Colorado. I live at 5,000’ elevation and frequently spend time off road at 10,000’ and I regret buying the turbo.

The higher the elevation the greater the turbo lag. I have found myself at 10,000’ having to turn around in a very tight spot – I step on the gas pedal and nothing happens for 2 or 3 seconds, then the boost kicks in and I’m lurched forward.

This is VERY unsettling when you’re on the edge of a cliff in the Rocky Mountains.

The turbo may be fine at low elevations, but NOT in Colorado.
 

whiteglad

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My opinion, after two 3.6L JKUR and one JT 3.6 is that you will like the advanced suspension of the newer Jeeps, and the 3.6 is the simplest, most reliable engine long-term. I'd avoid e-torque, and I just press the button every time to defeat the ess.
 

Grooster

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Does anyone who actually owns a 2.0 have any complaints or engine failures related to the 2.0? I don't really count the first 500 miles, as assembly & manufacturing defects happen to all motors. BSG/eTorque isn't 2.0 specific anymore, just wondering if there are actually any issues besides speculation.
I’m at 20,000 miles and it’s all been good. Will get some altitude testing next week in Colorado. Looking forward to it!
 

Rodeoflyer

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I drive a 3.6l and 6 speed manual a lot at 5k-12k feet (Denver to high country). It's more about gearing than turbo efficiency at elevation I think. Would I have considered the turbo if offered with the manual transmission? YES, not doubt I would have but that wasn't an option and I'm not driving up and down 5k feet with an auto trans. Furthermore I just like a manual. I've owned over a dozen vehicles since 1985 when I got my license to drive and more than half have been manual trans. I don't have to deal with some silly open door lockout/disable or any of the other nannies the auto trans and electronics cause.

The Tazer JL disables ESS so thats a non issue for me and I often need a rear locker at any speed/4hi in the winter.
 

TXHusker

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I am 3 months into a Rubi 4 door Recon..
Only one thing to say about the hybrid version..
even though the 0 to 60 is about 6.5 secs.
This engine has the zero to 30 of a much more powerful package.
Its that right off the line giddy jump that puts a smile on my face every time.
There is no mistaking the electric torque contribution here.
It is still inconceivable that each cylinder is only 500 cc's
Yet it is never lacking for thrust..The turbo is invisible as well..
and the whole package never shows signs of being taxed..just always there.
Viva la Alfa Romeo
I am sold!
Agree with many of the posters. Drive both and see what you prefer...you could make a solid argument for either. I bought a 2020 with the 2.0 Turbo in December, the acceleration off the line will definetly surprise you. For me, I have fun in mine, but it's also my daily driver - so a nice side benefit is I get 20-22 mpg consistently. Did a random google search on some of the specs for the 2020's:

https://www.planetchryslerjeepdodge.net/research/jeep-wrangler-engine-options.htm
 

Digiwolf

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Man I really need to find out why my 3.6 vibrates at idle lol.

Anyway, the only downside I can think of with the 2.0 is that you have to use premium gas.
Ignorant people need to be educated. Smh
 

Digiwolf

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I agree that the 2.0 does not require premium. It requires 87 Regular and recommends a higher Octane.

I just have to ask because I am not so familiar: is there a reason why higher octane gas is either recommended or required in Turbo Petrol Engines? Esp the older ones. Sorry as I do not have an Engineering Background (Finance/Business).
Older day engines were built with high compression and some still are like the Civic Si. only 200hp but requires Premium fuel.
 

Punjabi New Yorker

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Ignorant people need to be educated. Smh
I agree that the 2.0 does not require premium. It requires 87 Regular and recommends a higher Octane.

I just have to ask because I am not so familiar: is there a reason why higher octane gas is either recommended or required in Turbo Petrol Engines? Esp the older ones. Sorry as I do not have an Engineering Background (Finance/Business).
 

Blueeyedme

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I went with 3.6 for simplify and reliability. We'll see if that decision works out.
 

Rodeoflyer

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I went with 3.6 for simplify and reliability. We'll see if that decision works out.
fact of the matter is.. it's an easy swap if it fails.
 

jrt623

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I have a '19 JLUR with the 2.0. I was looking for the 3.6, but all I could find with the color/options/equipment I wanted was the 2.0. Don't regret it at all so far. This thing runs great and like msdesignltd said it does put a smile on my face whenever I punch it.
 

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