3.0L Eco Diesel and 35s

tacticalzl1

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Ok, Not new to Jeeps, but new to the Eco Diesel. I am curious if anyone has had any issues putting on 35in tires? Reading through the threads it looks like some extra mods need to be made if I want to put a 3-4in lift on it.

I'd be curious to hear from all the Jeepers with the Eco Diesel.

Thanks
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guarnibl

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Ok, Not new to Jeeps, but new to the Eco Diesel. I am curious if anyone has had any issues putting on 35in wheels? Reading through the threads it looks like some extra mods need to be made if I want to put a 3-4in lift on it.

I'd be curious to hear from all the Jeepers with the Eco Diesel.

Thanks
If all you want is 35" tires, just throw some Spidertrax WHS024 Wheel Spacers on (stock wheels) with some KO2 315/70R17's (assuming you're OK with spacers -- some are not). You do not need to lift it. And certainly nowhere near 3-4" of lift. I can run 40's on 4" of lift, for instance, and that is without fender trimming.

Without more information on your use case, it's hard to make suggestions. You will also need either a Tazer JL lite or equivalent utility device to set speedo.
 
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Ok, Not new to Jeeps, but new to the Eco Diesel. I am curious if anyone has had any issues putting on 35in wheels? Reading through the threads it looks like some extra mods need to be made if I want to put a 3-4in lift on it.

I'd be curious to hear from all the Jeepers with the Eco Diesel.

Thanks
35" wheels would make for some pretty huge tires. Fitment would be difficult to say the least.

If you're really looking for 35" tires, that's a lot easier.

If you have a Rubicon, you can put almost any 35" tire out there on the stock 17" wheels and run them with no other mods. I have some 35x12.5/17 GoodYear Duratracs on my Rubicon and they work great with no lift.

If you have a different model with the narrower axles and smaller fender flares, you will need to lift maybe 2-3" at least. You'll also want to move the wheels and tires out a little. You can do that with either wheel spacers with your stock wheels or aftermarket wheels with less backspacing (less positive offset, or even negative offset).
 
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guarnibl

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35" wheels would make for some pretty huge tires. Fitment would be difficult to say the least.

If you're really looking for 35" tires, that's a lot easier.

If you have a Rubicon, you can put almost any 35" tire out there on the stock 17" wheels and run them with no other mods. I have some 35x12.5/17 GoodYear Duratracs on my Rubicon and they work great with no lift.

If you have a different model with the narrower axles and smaller fender flares, you will need to lift maybe 2-3" at least. You'll also want to move the wheels and tires out a little. You can do that with either wheel spacers with your stock wheels or aftermarket wheels with less backspacing (less positive offset, or even negative offset).
Do you rub with full lock with those 35's on stock wheels and no lift when articulating? I had to run spacers, however I suppose you could limit the steering.
 

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Do you rub with full lock with those 35's on stock wheels and no lift when articulating? I had to run spacers, however I suppose you could limit the steering.
Not that I noticed. But I maybe wasn't at full stuff and full turn on the obstacles. I run the swaybar disconnected so I can articulate pretty good.
 
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tacticalzl1

tacticalzl1

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35" wheels would make for some pretty huge tires. Fitment would be difficult to say the least.

If you're really looking for 35" tires, that's a lot easier.

If you have a Rubicon, you can put almost any 35" tire out there on the stock 17" wheels and run them with no other mods. I have some 35x12.5/17 GoodYear Duratracs on my Rubicon and they work great with no lift.

If you have a different model with the narrower axles and smaller fender flares, you will need to lift maybe 2-3" at least. You'll also want to move the wheels and tires out a little. You can do that with either wheel spacers with your stock wheels or aftermarket wheels with less backspacing (less positive offset, or even negative offset).

I do have a Rubicon and I'm a bit more interested on how the Eco Diesel does with the larger tires. I know with my previous V6's with 3:73 or 4:10 gears it didnt do bad, but could feel a difference in it.
 

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I run mine over the mountain passes with 35's and the stock 3.73 gears. It runs fantastically, even at 12,000 feet. I had the dealer put on the tires so I never ran the stock 33" tires for a comparison. But I have plenty of power to get moving and when I'm on the uphill grades at altitude I have no trouble gunning it to pass someone. On the rocky trails, the Jeep crawls over obstacles like a tractor. Slow and steady with no issues. I see no need to regear for these 35's.
 

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I do have a Rubicon and I'm a bit more interested on how the Eco Diesel does with the larger tires. I know with my previous V6's with 3:73 or 4:10 gears it didnt do bad, but could feel a difference in it.
Been all over the mountains up to 10,000 feet and noticed no power loss from my 37" KO2's on stock wheels. If anything it's been a bit better since the torque is a bit more manageable now.

Just remember that wheel+tire weight combination matters. Keep it as light as possible. If you can run an AT vs an MT, go the AT route.

Stock Wheels: 23 pounds
Stock Tires (Falcon MT): 61 pounds or (KO2): 58 pounds.
37" KO2 Tires: 69 pounds.

So for me, going from stock (Falcons) to 37's was an 8 pound jump.

But bear in mind, if I would have gone for 37" Nitto Trail Grapplers, it would have been 84 pounds per tire -- a jump of 23 pounds per corner, or 26 pounds if you were running KO2's from factory. Now add in some heavy 50 pound aftermarket wheels, and you've just added another 27 pounds per corner. Or, in total, you added up to 53 pounds per corner.

So yeah, keep this in mind :) Rotational weight is the biggest enemy for this sorta thing.
 

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The EcoDiesels, regardless of trim, are about 1.25-1.5" taller than gassers, so in my experience, they will clear. I recently put on 315/70/17 BFG KO2's on the stock Willy's wheels(black painted Rubicon/MOAB wheels). They run just fine. The EcoDiesel doesn't even care or notice that they're there.

I had a tiny bit of rubbing when only when fully locked to the passenger side. It rubbed a little on the sway bar. I didn't want to run spacers, so I added a washer to the steering stops. A bag of 6 grade-8 locking washers from Lowes cost me less than $3. I added a dab of blue Loctite for insurance.

No more rubbing, and can't even tell the difference with the "lost" steering angle.

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I'm running 315/70/17 BFG KO2's with 2in mopar lift and wheel spacers, cannot tell the difference from when it was stock. The power and everything feels the exact same.
 

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Been all over the mountains up to 10,000 feet and noticed no power loss from my 37" KO2's on stock wheels. If anything it's been a bit better since the torque is a bit more manageable now.

Just remember that wheel+tire weight combination matters. Keep it as light as possible. If you can run an AT vs an MT, go the AT route.

Stock Wheels: 23 pounds
Stock Tires (Falcon MT): 61 pounds or (KO2): 58 pounds.
37" KO2 Tires: 69 pounds.

So for me, going from stock (Falcons) to 37's was an 8 pound jump.

But bear in mind, if I would have gone for 37" Nitto Trail Grapplers, it would have been 84 pounds per tire -- a jump of 23 pounds per corner, or 26 pounds if you were running KO2's from factory. Now add in some heavy 50 pound aftermarket wheels, and you've just added another 27 pounds per corner. Or, in total, you added up to 53 pounds per corner.

So yeah, keep this in mind :) Rotational weight is the biggest enemy for this sorta thing.
Weight is a secondary consideration. The bigger impact is the change in the tire diameter. Going from 33's to 35's roughly cuts around 6% of the effective power from the engine to the ground. Adding a few dozen pounds of tire is well under 1% extra weight. Even as additional rotational mass, that impact is clearly secondary.

Weight does play a minor role though. If you regear for larger diameter tires, you should always round up your gear choice to compensate for the additional weight, as well as the increased rolling resistance of a larger contact patch of the wider tire. But weight is not why you regear.

The thing about the 3.0 diesel is that it makes tons of power where it counts (low end torque). So the 6% loss in effective power due to the larger diameter tires just cuts into the ample margin of extra power that the engine produces over the 4 and 6 cylinder gas engines.
 

guarnibl

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Weight is a secondary consideration. The bigger impact is the change in the tire diameter. Going from 33's to 35's roughly cuts around 6% of the effective power from the engine to the ground. Adding a few dozen pounds of tire is well under 1% extra weight. Even as additional rotational mass, that impact is clearly secondary.

Weight does play a minor role though. If you regear for larger diameter tires, you should always round up your gear choice to compensate for the additional weight, as well as the increased rolling resistance of a larger contact patch of the wider tire. But weight is not why you regear.

The thing about the 3.0 diesel is that it makes tons of power where it counts (low end torque). So the 6% loss in effective power due to the larger diameter tires just cuts into the ample margin of extra power that the engine produces over the 4 and 6 cylinder gas engines.
Right, I don't mention tire diameter because that's not a variable here. Agreed though =) I would never consider re-gearing the diesel as from my perspective, there was no reason to spend the money. If I ran 40's all the time, I'd absolutely re-gear (or well, likely just replace the axles, to be honest -- and go 4.56's which puts me at less than 1% above the stock power to ground at the same speed).

Your point is a good call out, and certainly good information for others to be aware of. I do wish the diesel would have had a gear option, at least, from the factory. Even if it was just between 3.73 and 4.10.
 
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Right, I don't mention tire diameter because that's not a variable here. Agreed though =) I would never consider re-gearing the diesel as from my perspective, there was no reason to spend the money. If I ran 40's all the time, I'd absolutely re-gear (or well, likely just replace the axles, to be honest -- and go 4.56's which puts me at less than 1% above the stock power to ground at the same speed).

Your point is a good call out, and certainly good information for others to be aware of. I do wish the diesel would have had a gear option, at least, from the factory. Even if it was just between 3.73 and 4.10.
Yeah, the thread is about running 35s so I made an assumption.

I also wish you could get 4.10s with the diesel. Maybe not necessary for 35s but 37s would benefit for sure.
 
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