Jim1964

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So? Who buys one of these if that’s a priority. There’s a Volvo out there for people with that requirement.

I would happily buy a brand new CJ if they’d make them. And I ride motorcycles.

I never have bought into the safety at any cost way of thinking.
 


azwjowner

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So? Who buys one of these if that’s a priority. There’s a Volvo out there for people with that requirement.

I would happily buy a brand new CJ if they’d make them. And I ride motorcycles.

I never have bought into the safety at any cost way of thinking.
It's not just the safety though. This is really bad because Jeep made specific changes to fix the problem. That means that Jeep is doubly incompetent at engineering because they both (1) failed to fix the problem and (2) to accurately assess whether they had fixed the problem. It's one thing to not prioritize safety but another to spend several years attempting to fix a problem and failing miserably.
 

GATORB8

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I’m thinking a stubby, bigger axle with cast cs, and 37s stock may help. Only a 5’ ledge to climb.

They’d take the profit hit for the score right? That sounds like a solid new spec for the sport for me.

01FE863C-AAB6-42FD-824C-2948EFA59C06.jpeg
 

zakaron

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People focus too much on the fact that it lands on its side. I'd rather have the momentum of the impact slow gradually over time than come to an abrupt stop. The force of impact is lessened the more the vehicle can continue moving... even if that means going on its side. I randomly watched a few small overlap impacts on youtube, and watch how violently this one comes to a stop. No thanks.
 

bjm00se

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It's not just the safety though. This is really bad because Jeep made specific changes to fix the problem. That means that Jeep is doubly incompetent at engineering because they both (1) failed to fix the problem and (2) to accurately assess whether they had fixed the problem. It's one thing to not prioritize safety but another to spend several years attempting to fix a problem and failing miserably.
Well, you've clearly staked out your position here, and there's no question where you stand on this point. I'll give you that.
 


azwjowner

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Well, you've clearly staked out your position here, and there's no question where you stand on this point. I'll give you that.
Yes, but keep in mind I'm not commenting on the safety aspect of it. Just the massive engineering failure, which has implications throughout the vehicle (corroding hinges, anyone?). Whether you care or not about their goal, Jeep ought to be able to reliably assess whether they can pass the test following their modifications. They can't even do that. They keep producing vehicles that they believe pass and then they get surprised with failures.
 

Reinen

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It does confirm one thing for me, that plastic bumper doesn't do a damn thing. It just folded in at the frame mounting point and snapped right back.

And no wonder it flipped, look where they struck the barrier. 1/8" outside of the front frame. The bend in the frame at the back of the front wheel well pushed the entire Jeep (and passenger compartment) aside away from the barrier. The barrier was stuck at the perfect position to cause maximum lateral deflection. It literally followed the frame down to the bend at the back of the front wheel well and pushed the Jeep aside by the frame.

IMO, a steel bumper would have a different outcome (it would absorb energy and spread out the lateral deflection). If the Jeep struck the barrier 1" closer to the center (and hit the frame) or 2" further towards the outside (and missed the bend in the frame) both would have different outcomes. I'm not concerned about the engineering aspect of it. This is a very specific scenario that hits the barrier just right.

Personally, I'd rather have a deflecting impact and end up on my side than an impact that is 100% absorbed by the vehicle and stay on the tires.
 

GATORB8

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Yes, but keep in mind I'm not commenting on the safety aspect of it. Just the massive engineering failure, which has implications throughout the vehicle (corroding hinges, anyone?). Whether you care or not about their goal, Jeep ought to be able to reliably assess whether they can pass the test following their modifications. They can't even do that. They keep producing vehicles that they believe pass and then they get surprised with failures.
FCA boardroom:

“Ok, we have one engineering team and one intern team available for two projects.

Project 1: Fit 392
Project 2: Some safety test”
 

Tethmes

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It's not just the safety though. This is really bad because Jeep made specific changes to fix the problem. That means that Jeep is doubly incompetent at engineering because they both (1) failed to fix the problem and (2) to accurately assess whether they had fixed the problem. It's one thing to not prioritize safety but another to spend several years attempting to fix a problem and failing miserably.
I'm no engineer mind you, but how could they fix the problem without redesigning the entire styling of the vehicle? The small overlap test just hits plastic and tire on the wrangler, and by the time the majority of the energy from the impact contacts the actual body, the angle of the hit is going to be conducive to forcing a rollover.

 

Allmoparparts.com
 
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