2021 JLU-D Fuel additives and treatments

First Name
Nick
Joined
Sep 17, 2020
Messages
20
Reaction score
17
Location
Elkford, BC, Canada
Vehicle(s)
2021 jeep wrangler rubicon diesel
Hey, so I have owned my jeep now for about a month and a half. So far no issues to speak of.

However I was wondering what others are doing as far as fuel additives. This is my first diesel engined vehicle and doing research I've learned that its recommended for diesels to need a water separator additive and an anti-gel additive for colder climates (I live in the Rocky's of Canada).

I reached out to my dealership where I purchased the jeep and asked them what they'd recommend. They responded with "nothing" saying that with newer model diesel, additives aren't required.

So my question is, why? Can anyone elaborate on why they're not required. Or the alternative to why I still should consider using them and if so some product recommendations.
Advertisement

 

hazards280

Active Member
Joined
May 17, 2017
Messages
43
Reaction score
74
Location
Midland MI
Vehicle(s)
2020 JLU Willys - 3.0L Diesel
Hey Nick, you brought up some great questions! Bravo for questioning the value behind the additives, versus following the crowd and assuming it's just "what people do".

I did some research myself before I started using additives on my EcoDiesel at ~3k miles (~4k KM). I've linked a blog post from Hot Shot's Secret below that outlines everything in fairly good detail.

The main issue that's brought up in their post, as well as other additive producers are the lack of lubricity in modern ULDF. With these ultra low sulfur levels, we're inherently seeing less lubricity, which makes the engines work a bit harder and therefore less efficiently. I use their EDT (everyday diesel treatment) in the summer, and their anti-gel variant during these cold winter months. Although the Jeep is parked in a heated garage, I don't want to risk any gelling when I'm away from home. If you're not aware, diesel fuel begins to solidify around 15 degrees F (-10 C), and gelling agents have been around for quite a while to help prevent this.

Personal experience: I began using the EDT this summer, and switched to the anti-gel about 1 month ago. I noticed the engine was a touch quieter, but the overall driving dynamic felt exactly the same. To be frank though, I wasn't expecting much of a difference on a new engine. Do I believe the engine absolutely needs these additives, no. Is it worth some piece of mind, yes.

Everyone will have their own opinion on this topic, so I'm interested to hear what others have to say.

https://www.hotshotsecret.com/should-i-be-using-additives-on-my-new-vehicle/
 
Last edited:

JLURD

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2017
Messages
1,564
Reaction score
2,100
Location
Alaska
Vehicle(s)
2018 Compass Latitude 6MT, 2020 JLUR 3.0
Opti-Lube XPD. Unless you manage to take a warm weather regional diesel blend into sun-zero temps, you will likely never see gelling issues even without additives. Regions that get cold either add anti-gel compounds to the supply or kerosene for the same effect. I add xpd for lubricity to protect the fuel pump and injectors. The cetane boost pays for most of the cost in mildly improved mpg.
 

oceanblue2019

Well-Known Member
First Name
John
Joined
Apr 13, 2019
Messages
2,715
Reaction score
3,971
Location
Maryland
Vehicle(s)
2019 JLUR 2.0L Auto
Occupation
Metrology
Opti-Lube XPD. Unless you manage to take a warm weather regional diesel blend into sun-zero temps, you will likely never see gelling issues even without additives. Regions that get cold either add anti-gel compounds to the supply or kerosene for the same effect. I add xpd for lubricity to protect the fuel pump and injectors. The cetane boost pays for most of the cost in mildly improved mpg.
Used to run that in my Audi TDI's as the fuel pump had a reputation of failing due to lack of lube and was a $8,000 repair off warranty. Worked well and never had an issue in many many miles.
 

Edge Hawk

Active Member
First Name
Asa
Joined
Nov 12, 2020
Messages
43
Reaction score
29
Location
Freeland, MI
Vehicle(s)
2021 JLURD on order, 2014 JKUR & 1992 M101 CND 2 trailer
Hey Nick, you brought up some great questions! Bravo for questioning the value behind the additives, versus following the crowd and assuming it's just "what people do".

I did some research myself before I started using additives on my EcoDiesel at ~3k miles (~4k KM). I've linked a blog post from Hot Shot's Secret below that outlines everything in fairly good detail.

The main issue that's brought up in their post, as well as other additive producers are the lack of lubricity in modern ULDF. With these ultra low sulfur levels, we're inherently seeing less lubricity, which makes the engines work a bit harder and therefore less efficiently. I use their EDT (everyday diesel treatment) in the summer, and their anti-gel variant during these cold winter months. Although the Jeep is parked in a heated garage, I don't want to risk any gelling when I'm away from home. If you're not aware, diesel fuel begins to solidify around 15 degrees F (-10 C), and gelling agents have been around for quite a while to help prevent this.

Personal experience: I began using the EDT this summer, and switched to the anti-gel about 1 month ago. I noticed the engine was a touch quieter, but the overall driving dynamic felt exactly the same. To be frank though, I wasn't expecting much of a difference on a new engine. Do I believe the engine absolutely needs these additives, no. Is it worth some piece of mind, yes.

Everyone will have their own opinion on this topic, so I'm interested to hear what others have to say.

https://www.hotshotsecret.com/should-i-be-using-additives-on-my-new-vehicle/
Hey Hazards, I'm over in Freeland. Waiting on my green diesel to show up.
 

WXman

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 1, 2017
Messages
2,715
Reaction score
2,769
Location
Central Kentucky
Vehicle(s)
2018 Wrangler Unlimited
Occupation
Meteorology and Transportation
Sort of along this line of discussion... I found out yesterday that after using the Bosch CP4 injection pump for two model years (2019, 2020) Ram has gone back to the old CP3 injection pump for the 2021 model year. The CP4 is too problematic, too expensive to repair ($10k when it grenades), and wasn't working out with ULSD fuel that we have now.

GM ditched the CP4 for the 2017 model year and is using Denso for their injection now.

Which makes me wonder.... will FCA switch the EcoDiesel engines to the CP3 also? Or will we continue to see the sketchy CP4 used on these engines?

As long as the CP4 is under the hood, you'll need to swap fuel filters every 15k religiously and using Hot Shots EDT with each fill-up isn't a bad idea either.
 
Advertisement

Done Right LED
 
Advertisement
Top