stylett9

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Remember that the "standard 2.0 turbo" already is a mild hybrid system; it's already benefiting from start/stop and some regenerative braking and some electric assist off the line with the etorque system. The EPA classifies it as a mild-hybrid system. So the 4xe *when not plugged in* will do worse than the 2.0 mild hybrid because it's lugging around hundreds of pounds of battery that is "dead weight".

https://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/Find.do?action=sbs&id=41765
Fair point, except my 2020 jlur 2.0 does not have the mild hybrid assist, and I can achieve 20mpg, if not better.

Not intentionally trying to argue with anyone, but unless the true hybrid mpg simply didn’t get tested and quoted, it still feels a little gimmicky. Yes, you benefit if you plug in and charge everyday. But as a stand alone hybrid system, there is zero benefit, or to your point, a degradation in range as a result of the added weight. I guess at the end of the day it’s just not what I expected, is all.





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stylett9

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I suppose one additional data point that isn’t transparent. If you are getting 20mpg with 475 ft/lbs of torque still on tap, then perhaps that’s what I’m missing.
 

Raylan Givens

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You guys are getting numbers wrong. This vehicle is rated as 52mpg city and 45mpg highway. It’s only rating of 20mpg is when in gas mode only. When in HYBRID mode, the battery won’t ever run out. It can be in HYBRID mode forever, meaning you’ll always get the 45+mpgs.
You're going to have to provide something to back these statements up. I have no doubt I could achieve a 52 mpg average during a city commute, especially if I run the first 20 miles on electric only. However I have a hard time believing you are getting 45mpg on a long highway trip
 

Jonnie4xe

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Fair point, except my 2020 jlur 2.0 does not have the mild hybrid assist, and I can achieve 20mpg, if not better.

Not intentionally trying to argue with anyone, but unless the true hybrid mpg simply didn’t get tested and quoted, it still feels a little gimmicky. Yes, you benefit if you plug in and charge everyday. But as a stand alone hybrid system, there is zero benefit, or to your point, a degradation in range as a result of the added weight. I guess at the end of the day it’s just not what I expected, is all.
The EPA data is really confusing, and we need to interpret it a bit. Just like my post earlier that there is no way we are getting 49 MPGE on a long trip, I also believe the inverse is true and the 20 MPG number is meaningless right now. There is no way that there is no benefit (i.e. just getting 20 mpg on a typical round trip commute). At worst the 20 MPG rating is either 100% gas only or perhaps a full 17.3 gallon hybrid trip. If you are doing a longish commute of perhaps 50 to 70 miles a day and then recharging at night, you are getting well north of 20. I can't wait for some cars to be delivered next month for lots of reasons, but this is a big one. Looking forward to the reports, but I am guessing that typical longish commutes will be over 30.
 

greensprit

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Ok, maybe this will help out folks. Did the quick math based on the EPA numbers. Depending on how many miles you drive from the last time you fully charged your battery, here's the gas consumption you should see. For me with my 20 mile commute, I won't use any gas. If you've got a 50 mile round trip commute, you'll be getting ~33MPG.
4xe Gas Consumption.jpg


NOTE: Just remember that depending on where you get your electricity from, that will have it's own associated cost.
 

Raylan Givens

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Ok, maybe this will help out folks. Did the quick math based on the EPA numbers. Depending on how many miles you drive from the last time you fully charged your battery, here's the gas consumption you should see. For me with my 20 mile commute, I won't use any gas. If you've got a 50 mile round trip commute, you'll be getting ~33MPG.
I think the question is more along the lines of, is the 20 mpg estimate on gas only or is that the best you can hope to achieve in hybrid mode? Obviously you use zero gas for the 21 miles of all electric mode, which would drastically reduce fuel consumption. That would be great for my commute to and from work. However the numbers aren't as impressive if I am only getting 20 mpg when I am make a 100+ mile trip for my daughters soccer games on the weekends. Even less impressive if the EPA numbers were based on a lightly option Sahara, knowing that a loaded down Rubicon will get less efficiency.
 

Jonnie4xe

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I think the question is more along the lines of, is the 20 mpg estimate on gas only or is that the best you can hope to achieve in hybrid mode? Obviously you use zero gas for the 21 miles of all electric mode, which would drastically reduce fuel consumption. That would be great for my commute to and from work. However the numbers aren't as impressive if I am only getting 20 mpg when I am make a 100+ mile trip for my daughters soccer games on the weekends. Even less impressive if the EPA numbers were based on a lightly option Sahara, knowing that a loaded down Rubicon will get less efficiency.
Rubicon weights 122 lbs more than a Sahara (+2%) so that should not be an issue. With custom bumper, a winch etc. maybe +4%. Should not be material to fuel efficiency. I think for 100 miles it will still be better than all other Wranglers by as much as 50% (i.e. 30 mpg vs 20 mpg).
 

Raylan Givens

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The EPA will indicate Rub when they test a Rubicon. This test had to be a Sahara.
If they indicate Rubicon, they would indicate Sahara. Even the jeep website gives one number for both. Just like with the Ram, the certify for engines, not trim levels.
 

Raylan Givens

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Rubicon weights 122 lbs more than a Sahara (+2%) so that should not be an issue. With custom bumper, a winch etc. maybe +4%. Should not be material to fuel efficiency. I think for 100 miles it will still be better than all other Wranglers by as much as 50% (i.e. 30 mpg vs 20 mpg).
More than just the weight factors into it. The wheels, gearing, and height, also can impact the fuel economy
 

trainsafe

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Ok, maybe this will help out folks. Did the quick math based on the EPA numbers. Depending on how many miles you drive from the last time you fully charged your battery, here's the gas consumption you should see. For me with my 20 mile commute, I won't use any gas. If you've got a 50 mile round trip commute, you'll be getting ~33MPG.
4xe Gas Consumption.jpg


NOTE: Just remember that depending on where you get your electricity from, that will have it's own associated cost.
Thank you for creating this clear illustration. There are lots of ideas floating around, and various MPG claims. In reality, the data will be variable. Each of us here will see different results.

I'll get different results on the days that I'm local and picking kids up from sports and running errands in town than I will on the weekend when I run 88 miles to my weekend retreat (one way). Distance is a huge factor.

Jeep has yet to invent a perpetual energy device, so there won't be a single MPG rating that holds true for varying driving conditions.
 

JGlanton

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If they indicate Rubicon, they would indicate Sahara. Even the jeep website gives one number for both. Just like with the Ram, the certify for engines, not trim levels.
You can see for yourself on the EPA website that they do not list Sahara separately. They list Rubicon, Unlimited, and 2DR, with the different motor types as applicable.

Their test vehicle must be a Sahara.
 

Ron93YJ

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You can see for yourself on the EPA website that they do not list Sahara separately. They list Rubicon, Unlimited, and 2DR, with the different motor types as applicable.

Their test vehicle must be a Sahara.
It probably was a Sahara, and it’s fair to say that the Rubicon probably won’t have the same numbers “real world” as a Sahara. That being said, the EPA doesn’t always distinguish between trims. It’s likely that what’s listed will be the only EPA numbers we get for the Wrangler 4xe for 2021.
 

Raylan Givens

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You can see for yourself on the EPA website that they do not list Sahara separately. They list Rubicon, Unlimited, and 2DR, with the different motor types as applicable.

Their test vehicle must be a Sahara.
I have looked at the site, only on the diesel is the Rubicon separate. No clue why that is, but the other options are 2 dr, 4 dr, and 4xe. The 2 and 4 door option break it out by drive train, no difference between trims, so it is safe to assume they test whatever will give the best numbers.
 

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