2019 Order Help - Wait for 3.6l BSG? Worth it?

TCogs1

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I went back and forth on the 2.0 vs non etorque 3.6 until I read and learned about the warranties... You will be replacing paying for 2 batteries every 4-6 years in the etorques.... The 48 v battery is $1700 bucks... They can keep it...
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word302

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I’m personally glad to see them pushing the MPG. I’m with the epa on this one. Ya know. Global warming and all that.

I want to build the most fuel efficient rig that can still do what I want it to. I’m willing to pay a premium not to be a complete environmental a$$.

That said I’m not very happy with the bsg options. They add very little mileage which I’d be okay with if not for the dizzying complexity. There’s a very high cost of entry, cost of upkeep, and cost of fuel with the 2.0. The 3.5 only takes away the fuel part. And for a tiny gain. I wonder if i could put that money towards aluminum bumpers and skids and get a similar MPG on the 3.6 ESS.

Also if I’m giving up a manual which I reeeeeealy want then it better be for something good.

I would much rather pay the premium for the diesel assuming it’s going to get high 20s or wishfully thinking low 30s or the plug in. At least the plug in will be time tested from the Pacifica and give you a meaningful MPG boost.

I purchase mine at the end of 2019 so we will see what’s available then. Right now I love the Jeep but can’t say I’m loving the engine options. If I had to choose I’d go 3.6 and shed as much weight as I can and drive with a light foot.
Never mind the environmental impact of building and recycling these batteries. You kill the environment your way, I’ll kill it mine.
 

DocTwinkie

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Doc... Duh.
Never mind the environmental impact of building and recycling these batteries. You kill the environment your way, I’ll kill it mine.
Like you said they are recycled. As far as building more and more grid power is renewable and clean. So burying your head in the sand that it doesn’t matter isn’t helping.

The planet won’t care that it heats up. It’ll live just fine. But we probably won’t do very well.

I’m not saying everyone grab an electric car. These are built for a purpose and there’s no reason in my mind to get rid of them. But there’s also little reason for them to get gas mileage like it’s 1972 (or even use much if any gas at all) with modern technology. The only thing holding us back from everyone driving a zero or near zero emission car and every home being 100% solar is cost, special interest fossil fuel companies, and people who don’t like change.

I like the way FCA is going pushing the envelope on efficiency on a rolling brick. But I think the 2.0 BSG was a half measure more than likely for those die hard jeep owners who don’t think it’s a Jeep unless it burns gas and doesn’t have any of that hybrid tree hugging pansy stuff. Which is it kinda a funny insecurity issue.

I agree with the faults if the 2.0s complexity and cost for such a small benefit when they could (and will) go much farther. But again I think this was to entice those die hard guzzlers with torque and maybe some acceleration benefits so they maybe think a hybrid or alternative isn’t so bad next time around.

I don’t need the half measure. Sign me up for the next gen. I’d be stoked to make my commute on electrify only then be able to run a gas hybrid when trailing. I’m also down with a diesel which is far more efficient then petrol though they are extremely complicated to make low emission. Not impossible but complicated and as long as you do it right and not cheat (talking to you VW) then I’m down with it.

You can buy your guzzler while still at least rooting for future efficiency. Won’t fault you. Prices need to come down on fuel efficient tech. That’ll happen with more adoption. But I hope everyone can applaud those companies pushing for and people adopting the tech for the sake of everyone.
 

DocTwinkie

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Doc... Duh.
And yes. I know they get better gas mileage then 1972. It was an exaggeration to prove a point.
 

Sean L

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Yeah the hybrid makes more sense but I'm talking about the full electric version that keeps being mentioned. I don't think we'll see it in 2020 but it sounds like they are indeed working towards one.

“In addition to the all-new mild hybrid Wrangler, a full plug in electric Jeep Wrangler will be available in 2020,” Manley said. “Furthering our commitment to all those who value responsible, sustainable enjoyment of the great outdoors, including future proofing this Wrangler for generations to come.”
https://www.quadratec.com/c/blog/jeep-announces-all-electric-wrangler-2020
Its a Plug in Hybrid, with a gasoline engine, not a pure EV.
 

Snowjeep

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Its a Plug in Hybrid, with a gasoline engine, not a pure EV.
Ah, you look to be correct. I read that again and it does sound more like a hybrid plug in. The way they say "All Electric" or use the term "Full Plug in Electric Jeep", it sure sounds like an EV and not a hybrid.
 

Sean L

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Ah, you look to be correct. I read that again and it does sound more like a hybrid plug in. The way they say "All Electric" or use the term "Full Plug in Electric Jeep", it sure sounds like an EV and not a hybrid.
The way I understand, at least with the JK concept I referred to, It will have an electric motor for each wheel, and a small range extender gasoline engine. So it would have been electric drive only, like a Chevy Volt.

I've got no info on the upcoming model, so it might just be more like a traditional hybrid drivetrain, who knows.
 

Solidaxle

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Yes it’s always a good idea to actually read the article before you comment on it.
 

Snowjeep

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Yes it’s always a good idea to actually read the article before you comment on it.
Do you ever actually add anything to the conversation or do you just jump in randomly to add snide remarks?
 

viper88

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Specialized hybrid battery replacement has always been a huge cost that most people don't care about at new vehicle purchase point, as either they just don't think about it (its not in the brochure, and most people wouldn't understand the ramifications even if it was), or they think they'll have long since sold/traded the vehicle by the time the battery needs replacement.

All the specialized batteries I've seen for this type of application have been enormously expensive (think many thousands of $), but those were larger packs than the one in the 2.0T, so they may not be a good comparison. We're just now getting to the point where the hybrids are going to start aging out and battery replacements can be expected to be more common, so will economies of scale and multiple vendors come into play?

What is the expected lifetime of the 48V pack? 36,000 miles? 60,000 miles? 100,000 miles? No one knows. I'm guessing (?) it has the same 5/60 warranty as the rest of the powertrain, but the 48V battery may be excepted or have its own warranty, which could be shorter or longer than the standard, especially if the battery is considered a consumable/wear and tear item.


I tied looking up a JL 2.0 Turbo warranty but could not find it. I think the industry standard for hybrid warranties are 8 years/ 100K in most states. I think 10 year / 100K miles in states who adapted the California Emissions Rules if they are components of the emission system.

I called and asked someone at a Jeep dealer about the Max Care lifetime warranty and hybrid battery coverage. They were not sure but they said there was language in the policy that excluded high voltage batteries. I would assume the 48v battery is considered high voltage? He was not sure if any of the e-Torque components are covered under the lifetime warranty also. He said the way he read it would imply e-Torque components are not covered.
 

XJrider

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After test driving 5 Different jeeps from Rubicons to Saharas with 3.6 and 2.0 Turbo, I can confidently say that the 3.6 felt awkward, and misplaced in the jeep. First off, It made the entire vehicle feel heavy, stiff, and tough to manuver. Getting on the highway it took far to long to get the power I needed to successfully merge into traffic. Stop/Start with this engine was loud, rough, and laggy on take off. I have no experience with the 6 speed manual, so that might be a different story. From what I gathered on all my different examples is that the 2.0 Turbo was extremely smooth in all aspects, city and highway and effortlessly operated the engine stop/start feature. It was bearly noticeable and power was instant on take off and through the mid rpms. Zero lag from a Stop Start Situation. By the end of my drives I had not noticed that the stop start had occurred until the engine turned back on (which it did quietly). These reasons are why I personally believe the 2.0 is a better engine in this platform and the way to go unless you are holding out for a diesel. My 2019 JLUR Mojito is going to have the 2.0 and I'm extremely excited to be able to drive it everyday.
I couldnt disagree more with any of what you have said. Also proves youve never drove any jeep previous to a JL. Furthermore , its posts like this that make it so frustrating what so many people just buying jeeps for the first
Time in the brands HUGE linage and nitpick about their 50k purchase...
 

baysta

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I'm about to place an order for a 2019, what's the consensus? Is the 3.6L V6 w/ESS a better buy than with the BSG because of the lower complexity? Is the 2.0T better than the V6?
 

ads75

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I'm about to place an order for a 2019, what's the consensus? Is the 3.6L V6 w/ESS a better buy than with the BSG because of the lower complexity? Is the 2.0T better than the V6?
The current 3.6L is the most "proven", meaning its got the most miles and longest reputation. The BSG may improve things. Is the 2.0 better than the V6, depends on what you want, and how you feel about turbos. You could also make the argument that the new engines are better, technology constantly advances and leaves things behind. Time will tell.

I ordered a 2019 with the current 3.6L, but get what you want.
 

baysta

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After watching this video about the Ram 1500 eTorque, I understand less why people have such a hatred for the system, especially since for the Wrangler's it's covered for 80k/8years... It seems like a good thing, aside from the young age of the tech.
 

DocTwinkie

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Doc... Duh.
Here's my take. I want a 2019 Rubicon. I plan to place aluminum front and rear Rock Hard 4x4 Bumpers. They will be about 60lbs total. I will put Rock Slide engineering step sliders. Those will be 200lbs. I'll also likely put aluminum skids on it.

So that's about 260lbs. Maybe 400lbs if I do the skids. Minus the stock parts I'm replacing I suspect I'm adding about 140lbs with skids and 30lbs without. The bumpers will be about the same weight as the plastic. The slides will be a bit heavier than the stock rubicon ones I'm sure.

From there I'm plus/minus on 35s and Mopar Lift.

If that 2 liter with the above gets me 20 city and 25+ highway then sure I'm in. But I've seen MPGs all over the map form 14 to low 20s.

To me less than 20mpg isn't acceptable. So I'm hoping the diesel or the plug in meet my needs. I've not really got a clue what the MPGs on the 2.0 will do with that setup and with a light foot. If anyone is rocking a rubi with steel bumpers in a 2.0 and can let me know their MPGs I'd appreciate it,
 
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