2.0L Turbo JL Wrangler 0-60 MPH Acceleration Test (Video)

PhoenixM3

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[QUOTE

They have and always will mod the V6s too and they make the same power (slightly more actually) as the 2L without turbos or forced induction. The useable gains on the V6 3.6 will be more. A positive displacement supercharger on a Pentastar gives around or over 50% (140+HP) increases (e.g. Sprintex and Magnuson) and centrifugal SCs (RIPP) and turbos (Prodigy) give equal or more (but up top in revs). Sprintex supercharged JKUs can do 60 in low 5 seconds (sometimes under 5) which is 2 whole seconds faster than the 2L in the JLU (and they're completely drivable too) :D[/QUOTE]

Sure, you can throw a blower on the Pentastar for $5K or more..... for less than $1K you’ll be able to tune another 50hp from the 2 liter.
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The Great Grape Ape

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Sure, you can throw a blower on the Pentastar for $5K or more..... for less than $1K you’ll be able to tune another 50hp from the 2 liter.
But if you’re already paying $3,500 more for a 2.0T than a 3.6 manual with its better gears to add to that $1K tune, which one is getting you more return on investment, the $5K+ forced-air 3.6, or the $4.5K+ tuned 2.0T?
 

rtf500

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But if you’re already paying $3,500 more for a 2.0T than a 3.6 manual with its better gears to add to that $1K tune, which one is getting you more return on investment, the $5K+ forced-air 3.6, or the $4.5K+ tuned 2.0T?
That's an easy question, the vehicle with the otherwise stock engine will have a far greater return on investment than a highly modified 3.6 on trade in or outright sale. Could the blower be taken off and sold? Sure, to be honest I don't know what supercharger kits sell for in the used market. I understand the push back to the 2.0L, but I think we should atleast give it a chance, modern turbocharged engines have come a long way.
 

20ftRoosters

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I'd be a little more comfortable opening up the exhaust and turning up the boost on the 2.0T than I would adding forced induction to the V6, in terms of worry-free maintenance and a closer to stock experience.
 

The Great Grape Ape

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That's an easy question, the vehicle with the otherwise stock engine will have a far greater return on investment than a highly modified 3.6 on trade in or outright sale. Could the blower be taken off and sold? Sure, to be honest I don't know what supercharger kits sell for in the used market.
Or would the 100HP more get you even more in the resale market?
For the number of people salivating over a 368HP turbo a few weeks back, a 380HP+ should be an easier sell than a 318HP 2.0T when both have the drawbacks of non-stock forced air. The question is how much of the $4.5K+ and $5K+ you can recoup?

I understand the push back to the 2.0L, but I think we should atleast give it a chance, modern turbocharged engines have come a long way.
I’m not pushing back against the 2.0T itself, I think it’ll do fine, I am pushing back against the hype which seems to gloss over the other important details, which also tends to try elevating the one option at the expense of the other(s).

All 3 have their strengths and weaknesses, whomever doesn’t see that isn’t looking hard enough.
 

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What worries me out of the first drive impressions is the responsiveness of the 2.0L. What i love most of NA gasoline engines is their immediate response to pushing the right pedal. For me that is where most of the fun feeling comes from. I don't want lots of power and torque and then have it ruined by just that little bit of lag.
They say the 3.6L is better there... It is actually confusing as it seems to behave opposite on-road to off-road?
It looks like on-road the 3.6L is more sensible to pedal input though somebody mentioned on the rocks the 2.0L needed less pedal push than the 3.6L. Probably has to do with the mild hybrid doing its work there.
Though choice: you gotta consider torque difference, MPG, immediate response, engine tuneability, bigger tires and best tow capacity and on top of that reliability.
 

rtf500

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Sure, I think alot will be up to preference. I have a pentastar now, but have had two previously turbocharged tuned vehicles which were alot of fun. Everyone talks about lag, but we need to remember the 2.0L makes more power at a lower rpm than the pentastar.
 

Euro JEEP

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Sure, I think alot will be up to preference. I have a pentastar now, but have had two previously turbocharged tuned vehicles which were alot of fun. Everyone talks about lag, but we need to remember the 2.0L makes more power at a lower rpm than the pentastar.
Yes indeed and this is just what surprised me in some of the reviews that, despite the 2.0L having better torque, they have better feeling on the 3.6L around responsiveness.

On the turbo tunes can you tell us some more what you did and what it achieved please?
 

The Great Grape Ape

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Everyone talks about lag, but we need to remember the 2.0L makes more power at a lower rpm than the pentastar.
Not sure about that; have they published a torque curve yet?

The maxes may be at different points, but that doesn’t show how the power comes on, and with the Pentastar delivering over 95% torque by 2K RPM the peak torque is rather irrelevant for that extra few percentage. The linear power delivery and flat torque curve of the he Pentastar might have it leading the 2.0T itself until a cross-over point. The 3.8L had great low-end numbers on paper below 1K RPM, but then rose gradually aftter that and crossed under the Pentastar by about 1,200 RPM, similar wih the older 4.0L where off-idle it was great for crawling, but the cross-over was fairly low.

The 2.0T might have (likely has) two early cross-over points where the BSG has a guaranteed initial lead, then a cross over as engine speed reduces its efficacy and then it slowly builds until the turbo comes on, so the Pentastar might have an advantage between 1K-2K, but the 2.0T with BSG having the advantage on both ends of that region.

The BSG likely helps a lot, and within a year the Pentastar will have that same benefit, so it would be interesting to see the role the BSG plays in this and how the 2.0T acts alone with BSG disabled.

As for lag, people seem to forget lag is a time thing, not an RPM thing, if it takes the turbo a second or two to spool up and provide RPM, how is that better than an NA engine that can get to its peak sooner even if at a higher RPM.

That there is still mention of lag in many of the reviews despite the addition of the BSG shows it remains an issue for those that notice it.

Until we see a torque curve, with and without BSG, it’s hard to say anything based on just max HP/Torque numbers.
 

The Great Grape Ape

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I also wonder how the BSG will act on the trail with prolonged use for multiple quick bursts in succession and whether it will reach a point of depletion where it needs to have the engine run a while to recharge before being able to contribute again.
 

Rubi

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Does anybody know what the engine mileage warranty for this 4 banger is? Usually auto companies will give you 100k and then you’re on your own. Engine longevity, dirty valve seats with direct injection could be a possibility, exhaust turbines rarely make it past 100k as well. BSG durability is another unknown.

All you excited turbo loving high strung engine lovers can be the litmus test on this very new technology. I’ll stick with the Pentastar and be relatively worry free.
 

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I also wonder how the BSG will act on the trail with prolonged use for multiple quick bursts in succession and whether it will reach a point of depletion where it needs to have the engine run a while to recharge before being able to contribute again.
I can totally relate to that.
 

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IF the engine uses modern technology DI with the turbo it allows more boost aka torque @ very low RPM because the fuel directly injected into the combustion chamber cools it allowing more boost without engine pinging. having a turbo car non DI now + previously i can attest to their performance + DI surely can enhance it. manual transmissions are always better with turbocharging as yo can hold a gear as desired. IF + a BIG IF the engine is built right a little tuning can enhance performance but will generally kill any warranty. even with stock programming a very important high flow exhaust allowing quicker turbo reaction + of course a bit more intake as well to match. todays ECU's will handle smaller changes + adapt but big power + torque will require proper tuning for a reliable engines. as an example look @ the #'s that APR gets out of the VW + Audi 2.0T engines + of course 91 or 93 octane is required, time will tell!! the downsides $$$ better oil is required + shorter changes are required, oil like Redlines REAL Ester based synthetic is best by far after 3,000 mike break-in + of course theres the carboning issues with DI + usually worse with forced induction IF the system is not designed correctly, can you say BETA tester!!!!!
 

rtf500

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Not sure about that; have they published a torque curve yet?

The maxes may be at different points, but that doesn’t show how the power comes on, and with the Pentastar delivering over 95% torque by 2K RPM the peak torque is rather irrelevant for that extra few percentage. The linear power delivery and flat torque curve of the he Pentastar might have it leading the 2.0T itself until a cross-over point. The 3.8L had great low-end numbers on paper below 1K RPM, but then rose gradually aftter that and crossed under the Pentastar by about 1,200 RPM, similar wih the older 4.0L where off-idle it was great for crawling, but the cross-over was fairly low.

The 2.0T might have (likely has) two early cross-over points where the BSG has a guaranteed initial lead, then a cross over as engine speed reduces its efficacy and then it slowly builds until the turbo comes on, so the Pentastar might have an advantage between 1K-2K, but the 2.0T with BSG having the advantage on both ends of that region.

The BSG likely helps a lot, and within a year the Pentastar will have that same benefit, so it would be interesting to see the role the BSG plays in this and how the 2.0T acts alone with BSG disabled.

As for lag, people seem to forget lag is a time thing, not an RPM thing, if it takes the turbo a second or two to spool up and provide RPM, how is that better than an NA engine that can get to its peak sooner even if at a higher RPM.

That there is still mention of lag in many of the reviews despite the addition of the BSG shows it remains an issue for those that notice it.

Until we see a torque curve, with and without BSG, it’s hard to say anything based on just max HP/Torque numbers.
Great points, some I didn't think about until you mentioned them. The turbo cars I've had with in the past were APR tuned VAG vehicles with either the 1.8T or 2.7TT. Looking forward as time goes on to see how this engine performs in the Wrangler, obviously a little different application than a normal 2.0L.
 

PhoenixM3

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But if you’re already paying $3,500 more for a 2.0T than a 3.6 manual with its better gears to add to that $1K tune, which one is getting you more return on investment, the $5K+ forced-air 3.6, or the $4.5K+ tuned 2.0T?
I was primarily stating that the turbo motor will be easier/cheaper to modify for more power. I wasn't taking into account which engine a buyer would choose, because most probably already know and are saving their pennies for modifications anyway.
 
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