oldcjguy

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A real tune isn't going to have occasional power loss from the ECU limiting torque, in any weather. The JB4 can only intercept & modify the signals that it taps into, whereas a tune is literally clanging the operating logic on the ECU. It is a more direct and accurate way of making modifications, and it's exactly how the manufacturer controls your motor (well, with the ECU being locked).

The Pedal Commander can't change how the ECU interprets the pedal signal, it can only "enhance" the existing signal by making it go to 100% earlier (basically the pedal commander can't do anything your foot couldn't do already).
Also the tune can modify your pedal as well. Not sure if that's one of the adjustable options available in the tuner. I'd have to go out and check. I found I didn't want to amp up the pedal after I got the tune. It didn't need it to feel responsive.





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SargeWiegand

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I went ahead and ordered it. Thank you for your comments. For those that have installed, the PCM video does not mention disconnecting the 2nd battery. Did anyone just disconnect the primary battery and leave the 2nd battery alone?
 

TimnTexas

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I went ahead and ordered it. Thank you for your comments. For those that have installed, the PCM video does not mention disconnecting the 2nd battery. Did anyone just disconnect the primary battery and leave the 2nd battery alone?
Does the 2.0 have a second battery? I thought the v6 was the only one with the extra battery? Maybe because I have etorque I only have one.
I only disconnected the one visibility from the hood open and easy to access. Drove a bit more today and really liking the tune. Also, as mentioned the torque limiter is removed and that was the driver that pushed me to go with superchips over JB4. I have a Altitude Sahara for reference so it has the 3.45 rear gears, I can only image the 4.10 rubis will be more dramatic.
 
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My current setup is the following:
Pedal Commander
Burger JB4
Tazer Mini
Mishimoto Intake, intercooler, catch can
GFB DV+

I have found that I get occasional power loss when punching it, particularly in cooler weather. If I go this route. If I am understanding this correctly I would be removing the Pedal Commander, Burger JB4 and the Tazer Mini? I use the Tazer for front camera, larger tires and disabling the auto off feature.

What advantages do I gain going this route over keeping what I have?

@Superchips_Mrktg
I can't comment as to your power loss situation. But yes, the Flashpaq tuning should be able to do most everything you already have, with some trade offs here and there. Overall, the power delivery will be much smoother with a lot more low end. Drivability should improve as well because of the extensive time we invested in adjusting transmission shift and converter strategies.

Our tuning does have some pedal sensitivity adjustments from stock, but it's not user adjustable like a pedal boost module would be, so some drivers still like to combo our Flashpaq with our Amp'd Throttle Adjuster (or competitors version) to fine tune the pedal feel to their personal preference.

Overall, I think the Flashpaq tune just offers a better overall driving experience compared to the other tuning option on the market, which is only really adjusting your boost pressure to increase power. We're doing a lot more than that.
 

AnnDee4444

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Does the 2.0 have a second battery? I thought the v6 was the only one with the extra battery? Maybe because I have etorque I only have one.
I only disconnected the one visibility from the hood open and easy to access. Drove a bit more today and really liking the tune. Also, as mentioned the torque limiter is removed and that was the driver that pushed me to go with superchips over JB4. I have a Altitude Sahara for reference so it has the 3.45 rear gears, I can only image the 4.10 rubis will be more dramatic.
I thought the 2.0 etorque ess had the 2nd battery for the stop start function...but I could be wrong!
As far as I know, all JLs have two batteries regardless of engine.
  • All models get the 12V battery under the hood
  • eTorque = an additional 48V battery under the drivers side
  • PHEV's second battery is 400V and under the rear seat
  • All others have the second smaller 12V battery under the main battery
  • I'm not 100% sure about the diesel or 392, but I believe they are the same
 

DadJokes

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I can't comment as to your power loss situation. But yes, the Flashpaq tuning should be able to do most everything you already have, with some trade offs here and there. Overall, the power delivery will be much smoother with a lot more low end. Drivability should improve as well because of the extensive time we invested in adjusting transmission shift and converter strategies.

Our tuning does have some pedal sensitivity adjustments from stock, but it's not user adjustable like a pedal boost module would be, so some drivers still like to combo our Flashpaq with our Amp'd Throttle Adjuster (or competitors version) to fine tune the pedal feel to their personal preference.

Overall, I think the Flashpaq tune just offers a better overall driving experience compared to the other tuning option on the market, which is only really adjusting your boost pressure to increase power. We're doing a lot more than that.
Are there sub 2k rpm gains present at part throttle? IE- will this tune enable the average user with taller tires and more drag to stay in 8th gear on the hwy better than prior to the tune? With a stock tune and taller tires without a regear, some find they are rarely in 8th gear anymore. Should this help get some of that 8 th gear retention back if it doesn’t need to downshift as often to maintain speed? I hope I’m relaying my question well enough.
 
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Are there sub 2k rpm gains present at part throttle? IE- will this tune enable the average user with taller tires and more drag to stay in 8th gear on the hwy better than prior to the tune? With a stock tune and taller tires without a regear, some find they are rarely in 8th gear anymore. Should this help get some of that 8 th gear retention back if it doesn’t need to downshift as often to maintain speed? I hope I’m relaying my question well enough.
The tune will definitely help with some of the drivability and pep that is lost by installing larger tires, no question. But ultimately, with big tires a re-gear is always going to be most beneficial when it comes maintaining that low end feel. It's pretty tough to overcome the mechanical disadvantage.

Our 2020 2.0L is the Rubicon model with 4.10 gears, it will maintain 8th gear on the freeway, even with the 37's we just installed, but we do anticipate changing to some 4.88's just to make sure we're using the gear ratio's to get that absolute most out of the combo.
 

AnnDee4444

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Are there sub 2k rpm gains present at part throttle? IE- will this tune enable the average user with taller tires and more drag to stay in 8th gear on the hwy better than prior to the tune? With a stock tune and taller tires without a regear, some find they are rarely in 8th gear anymore. Should this help get some of that 8 th gear retention back if it doesn’t need to downshift as often to maintain speed? I hope I’m relaying my question well enough.
That's actually one of the cool things that can be done with the drive by wire tuning: you can tune it so that in 8th gear your pedal is at 10%, but the ECU is commanding up to 100% throttle without the transmission downshifting. Increase the pedal to 50%, and the ECU is still commanding 100% throttle, but now also sends the signal for downshift. So while this doesn't actually increase peak power, it would increase the usability of the power that's already there. I'm betting that Superchips has tweaked some of this in their tune, in addition to the part throttle power gains.

Side note: I did an E-tune on my DBW Honda S2000. The data logging was performed by loading two rounds of 9 separate test tunes and recording the AFR results of 3 pulls on each test tune. From what I understand, these test tunes were really just adjusting the throttle mapping so that the car would drive like normal, then when it was time to datalog your WOT pull would only result in the ECU commanding 30% throttle instead of 100%. The next tune would be 60% instead of 100%, and so on. This allowed an easily repeatable way of part throttle tuning that could not be achieved with a traditional cable operated throttle. Cool stuff, and the tune gained tons of mid-range torque over stock.
 

DadJokes

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That's actually one of the cool things that can be done with the drive by wire tuning: you can tune it so that in 8th gear your pedal is at 10%, but the ECU is commanding up to 100% throttle without the transmission downshifting. Increase the pedal to 50%, and the ECU is still commanding 100% throttle, but now also sends the signal for downshift. So while this doesn't actually increase peak power, it would increase the usability of the power that's already there. I'm betting that Superchips has tweaked some of this in their tune, in addition to the part throttle power gains.

Side note: I did an E-tune on my DBW Honda S2000. The data logging was performed by loading two rounds of 9 separate test tunes and recording the AFR results of 3 pulls on each test tune. From what I understand, these test tunes were really just adjusting the throttle mapping so that the car would drive like normal, then when it was time to datalog your WOT pull would only result in the ECU commanding 30% throttle instead of 100%. The next tune would be 60% instead of 100%, and so on. This allowed an easily repeatable way of part throttle tuning that could not be achieved with a traditional cable operated throttle. Cool stuff, and the tune gained tons of mid-range torque over stock.
Basically, I’d hope for being able to go from 32’s to 34’s max and not lose as much 8th gear retention at hwy speeds. More low end power at hwy rpms should avoid downshifting you’d think.
 

WhyUMad

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Will we be able to install a TurboSmart EM Blow-Off Valve & not throw a code now? Would this require us telling you to do something in the tune to accommodate the venting to atmosphere & the Jeep not thinking there's a leak somewhere? I'd like to gain consistent boost & also the "Pshhhh" sound synonymous with turbo vehicles & this seems like the way to go to support that modification. I've attached the blow-off valve in question. It's amazing on my tuned Raptor, so I'd like to put one on the Rubicon without issue as well.

I currently have a CAI & exhaust, so I'd like to add this along with the charge pipe from Mishimoto & call it a day without any codes being thrown. I still get a code thrown from my S&B CAI from time to time, even with the fix they sent me. Would this immediately aid in fixing these codes, or is there something we can request in the tune to prevent these codes from occurring? Thanks.


https://www.cjponyparts.com/turbosm...jeep-wrangler-jl-2-0l-2018-2021/p/TS02231086/
 

DadJokes

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Will we be able to install a TurboSmart EM Blow-Off Valve & not throw a code now? Would this require us telling you to do something in the tune to accommodate the venting to atmosphere & the Jeep not thinking there's a leak somewhere? I'd like to gain consistent boost & also the "Pshhhh" sound synonymous with turbo vehicles & this seems like the way to go to support that modification. I've attached the blow-off valve in question. It's amazing on my tuned Raptor, so I'd like to put one on the Rubicon without issue as well.

I currently have a CAI & exhaust, so I'd like to add this along with the charge pipe from Mishimoto & call it a day without any codes being thrown. I still get a code thrown from my S&B CAI from time to time, even with the fix they sent me. Would this immediately aid in fixing these codes, or is there something we can request in the tune to prevent these codes from occurring? Thanks.


https://www.cjponyparts.com/turbosm...jeep-wrangler-jl-2-0l-2018-2021/p/TS02231086/
The past year I’ve read the GFB diverter is the way to go fwiw. I don’t think I’ve read of one issue. TS... many.
 

WhyUMad

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The past year I’ve read the GFB diverter is the way to go fwiw. I don’t think I’ve read of one issue. TS... many.
That’s why I’m asking if the tune would be able to eliminate the “boost leak” code produced with the turbosmart. The GFB diverter still produces issues on some, so I’m waiting until they come out with a solution to eliminate the codes completely. The TS is far superior in design though, it just needs to be accounted for in a tune. The TS EM version is also 100% plug & play & is way better than the mechanical version on my Raptor. It also produces the most pronounced “woooosh” sound. I’m just seeing if their canned tune can account for these mods or if I’ll need a custom tune to take care of it basically. Also, using the TS EM is plug & play & will allow you to return to stock much quicker & easier if needed, rather than taking apart the stock blow-off valve to put on & take off the GFB diverter. I think I read that you risk breaking the stock BOV parts to put tje GFB on.
 

DadJokes

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That’s why I’m asking if the tune would be able to eliminate the “boost leak” code produced with the turbosmart. The GFB diverter still produces issues on some, so I’m waiting until they come out with a solution to eliminate the codes completely. The TS is far superior in design though, it just needs to be accounted for in a tune. The TS EM version is also 100% plug & play & is way better than the mechanical version on my Raptor. It also produces the most pronounced “woooosh” sound. I’m just seeing if their canned tune can account for these mods or if I’ll need a custom tune to take care of it basically. Also, using the TS EM is plug & play & will allow you to return to stock much quicker & easier if needed, rather than taking apart the stock blow-off valve to put on & take off the GFB diverter. I think I read that you risk breaking the stock BOV parts to put tje GFB on.
Is the code related to metered air? If so, how do you calculate something that can vary? Just curious. I’ve not self tuned a turbo and the last thing I tuned was 90’s tech 10 years ago for naturally aspirated.
 

WhyUMad

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Is the code related to metered air? If so, how do you calculate something that can vary? Just curious. I’ve not self tuned a turbo and the last thing I tuned was 90’s tech 10 years ago for naturally aspirated.
Not really sure tbh. All I know is if you did the TS BOV mod on a Raptor without a tune, you'd get a similar code as the Jeeps get. I believe it might be assuming there's a leak somewhere since it is venting some of that air to the atmosphere, rather than fully recirculating. The GFB might not throw a code, but imo my CAI won't throw a hard code (shows on the dash), but if you go into the history it shows that one was thrown. I think the GFB will throw a code no matter what eventually, as it may be for a split second like my CAI code throws a lean code for a brief moment based off of a specific driving condition experienced. On my hellcat I used to have, I ported the stock throttle body & if you went 100% throttle & then immediately let off it'd throw a code for a brief second because the throttle body didn't close as fast as it did unported. These newer vehicles are very finicky & it's most likely a non-issue, but the computer will put it into limp mode & that's what becomes the issue. Also, my OCD doesn't allow me to ignore check engine lights very well.
 

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