JLUHT

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With Jeeps I think it is because of their design simplicity. It is one of the few cars that that doesn't look like sh!t once a new model comes out. Average non-jeep person can't tell the difference between a JK & JL, especially if one has been modded some.

This means you can drive them a long time and still feel good about the car. In addition, since they aren't over loaded with tech / electronics they also seem to hold up pretty well over the years.

Some cars just age well and I think Jeep Wranglers, much like 911s, have a design that ages nicely which keeps values up.
I see JKs that turn my head and I'm like "oh shoot that was older one."

Where do Corvettes land on the depreciation list?

 

LuvHydro

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If iSee is correct, after 5 years mine would be worth $64 less than I paid. Not bad.

I wonder what they are using for yearly mileage tho. Mine will average 20K per year, so should have about 100K in 5 years.
 


TXRubicon

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Calls out the Wrangler and 718 Cayman as appreciating. My last 718 Cayman I sold in January for $10k more than I’d paid for it 2 year prior and just took delivery of a new one last month. While our Wrangler hasn’t appreciated, it’s value is around 84% of what we paid 4 years ago. That’s not terrible at all but nowhere near the 8% they’re claiming.

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zrickety

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Mustangs are as common as flies here. The ratio is the inverse of the sales figures you mention: 4+ Mustangs observed for every one Wrangler.

By extension, their sheer numbers translates to a used market that, if not exactly saturated, isn't one that has ever suffered for choice. That's the detail that suggests the model's presence on the Least Depreciation list as something seemingly anomalous: their robust valuations not being linkable to low numbers that they don't possess. That they're non-practical coupes with functionally useless back seats is simply additive here. Yes, the Porsche 911 on the list can also be described thusly, but it's a Porsche, not a Ford.
They are common here as well. I will say that a nice GT with desirable options is hard to find, and when we were looking there was a 6 month wait for a manual transmission car. Wife ended up with a 2016 that is essentially the same body as the 2022.

 

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